Why Online Programs Fail, and 5 Things We Can Do About It | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

See on Scoop.itMOOCS Higher education

Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of learning, teaching, and technology that combines the strands of critical pedagogy and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.

 

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This article is the first of four by different authors in the field. The article moots 5 strategies to consider so as to avoid the failure of an online program, including: the need to create new embodied pedagogy for online learning environments, different to that delivered ‘on the ground’; and the need for these pedagogies and programs to be designed and driven by educators, not industry. Whilst this has been long recognised, the tendency is for Massive MOOC providers to dominate, drive and deliver the increasing majority of online courses. In the race to get a MOOC up and running, it may be easier and more cost effective for universities to outsource its delivery, but at what cost?

See on www.hybridpedagogy.com

The Discussion Forum is Dead; Long Live the Discussion Forum | Tools | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

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Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of learning, teaching, and technology that combines the strands of critical pedagogy and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

The authors, Sean Michael Morris and Jesse Stommel critique the LMS discussion forum in this hard-hitting article. They argue that applying rules in discussion forums kills any chance of spontaneous, creative engagement in discussion.  "The resulting posts do not constitute participation; they constitute attendance. What’s being measured is a student’s willingness and ability to check into the course twice each week. And while the required length of a post can force students to do more “talking” than they might otherwise do, this does not necessarily qualify as real engagement."

And continuing in this vein…

"They become over-cultivated factory farms, in which nothing unexpected or original is permitted to flourish. Students post because they have to, not because they enjoy doing so."

 

The authors offer other solutions to use with, or replace the LMS discussion forum – the types of social network platforms and tools that students are entthusiastically using for everything else in their lives for  "delightful, persistent, meaningful conversation":

Vanilla Forums

Disqus
Twitter

Facebook

Google+ / Google Hangouts

See on www.hybridpedagogy.com

Simple Techniques for Applying Active Learning Strategies to Online Course Videos | Faculty Focus

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From Web-enhanced face-to-face courses to MOOCs, flipped, blended, and fully online courses, videos are an integral component of today’s educational landscape—from kindergarten all the way through higher education.

 

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This article by Emily A. Moore is well worth a read if you use videos in online or face to face learning environments. One of the criticisms of the flipped classroom (posting recorded lectures and screencasts online and using lecture/tutorial/class time for active learning) is that shifting non-interactive lectures into a different domain does little to alleviate the non-engagement factor.The 4 key strategies listed require that teachers think critically about their learning and teaching intentions. The inclusion of opportunities to question, contextualise, discuss and think critically about the content in the video, students are encouraged to ‘dive below the surface ‘ of the content and hopefully, learn more effectively. I particularly like the suggestion to add contextual information to the resource (Strategy 1b)

See on www.facultyfocus.com

How to Create an E-Learning Template That Works » The Rapid eLearning Blog

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

The Rapid eLearning Blog provides a simple but effective template as a useful starting point for designing an online module. The benefit of designing a template that suits a specific course is that there is consistencyand ease for participants accessing modules across the course.

See on www.articulate.com

Elements of Effective e-Learning Design | Brown | The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning

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Elements of Effective e-Learning Design

 

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This article by Andrew R. Brown from Queensland University of Technology and Bradley D. Voltz from St Joseph’s Nudgee College Brisbane proposes that six dimensions should be addressed in the design and delivery of any online course: creating rich learning activities:

– situating activities within an interesting story line

– providing meaningful opportunities for student reflection and third party criticism

– considering appropriate technologies for delivery

– ensuring that the design is suitable for the context in which it will be used

– taking into account the personal, social, and environmental impact of the designed activities.

See on www.irrodl.org

Moodle 2: Activity Tool Guide for Instructors

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Poster size guide for Instructors. Allows them to compare the functionality and pedagogical advantages of Moodle 2 Activity tools (Add a resource). Adapted from Joyce Seitzinger and Gavin Henrick.

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This Moodle Activity Guide has been around for a while but it is still very useful for teachers new to Moodle and ensures that the underlying learning and pedagogical intention aligns with the planned activity.

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Enhancing Learning & Teamwork Skills in Moodle

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Instructional Technology Series Workshop, University of Victoria January, 2013 Mariel Miller Allyson Hadwin

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This University of Victoria Slideshare presentation explains the benefits of successful collaboration in achieving rich learning outcomes. It documents a collaborative project designed to support first year university students in becoming self-regulated learners, through involvement in a 5 member group collaborative project. The project incorporates an online jigsaw format and this is the key interest for me. Moodle feedback and quiz activities provide opportunities for individual and group feedback and reflection, and a wiki enables members to share their ‘expert’ cheat sheets for peer review, feedback and sharing.

See on www.slideshare.net

Remaining relevant: Powerful Partnership A Shared Responsibility for Learning: A Joint Report.pdf

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This Joint Report from the American Association for Higher Education, American College Personnel Association, National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, published in 1998, recommended 10 learning principles and collaborative actions as key drivers for effecting learning improvements in higher education.The paper advocates shared responsibilities and collaborative partnerships between faculty, staff, and students for effecting rich learning experiences and environments. The underlying principles are as relevant today as they were nearly 15 years ago.

See on www.myacpa.org

Using online lectures to support active learning – Case study

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What do you think of this resource? Please click http://svy.mk/e6BP1G to complete a quick survey. Download the supporting PDF file for this episode http://bi...

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

One of the COFA.online series of ‘Learning to Teach Online’ videos.Two lecturers explain how incorporating active learning strategies in lectures has helped students learn more effectively.

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LTTO Episodes | COFA Online Gateway

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

The Learning to Teach Online Episodes include free online video resources that cover a host of topics  related to online teaching contexts, planning and pedagogy. Some of the videos are case-studies that provide exemplars for implementing effective online practices in higher education classes and  lectures.

See on online.cofa.unsw.edu.au