Simple Techniques for Applying Active Learning Strategies to Online Course Videos | Faculty Focus

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From Web-enhanced face-to-face courses to MOOCs, flipped, blended, and fully online courses, videos are an integral component of today’s educational landscape—from kindergarten all the way through higher education.

 

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This article by Emily A. Moore is well worth a read if you use videos in online or face to face learning environments. One of the criticisms of the flipped classroom (posting recorded lectures and screencasts online and using lecture/tutorial/class time for active learning) is that shifting non-interactive lectures into a different domain does little to alleviate the non-engagement factor.The 4 key strategies listed require that teachers think critically about their learning and teaching intentions. The inclusion of opportunities to question, contextualise, discuss and think critically about the content in the video, students are encouraged to ‘dive below the surface ‘ of the content and hopefully, learn more effectively. I particularly like the suggestion to add contextual information to the resource (Strategy 1b)

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Active Learning

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Diane Starke from  El Paso Community College has compiled a comprehensive online resource on Active Learning and it is jam-packed with numerous informative links related to the sub topics: definitions, discipline-specific strategies, how to adapt a lecture format, challenges and ‘roadblocks’, and related research (up until 2001).

“Learning is an active search for meaning by the learner – constructive knowledge rather than passively receiving it, shaping as well as being shaped by experience….To stimulate an active search for meaning, faculty [must]: expect and demand student participation in activities in and beyond the classroom;design projects and endeavors through which students apply their knowledge and skills; andbuild programs that feature extended and increasingly challenging opportunities for growth and development”.

http://www.myacpa.org/pub/documents/taskforce.pdf 

 

 

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Using online lectures to support active learning – Case study

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

One of the COFA.online series of ‘Learning to Teach Online’ videos.Two lecturers explain how incorporating active learning strategies in lectures has helped students learn more effectively.

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LTTO Episodes | COFA Online Gateway

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

The Learning to Teach Online Episodes include free online video resources that cover a host of topics  related to online teaching contexts, planning and pedagogy. Some of the videos are case-studies that provide exemplars for implementing effective online practices in higher education classes and  lectures.

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Active Learning Panelists | Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences

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Founded in 1890, Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) is the largest division of the University and comprises Harvard College and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, including undergraduate and graduate admissions; the School of…

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

3 Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences lecturers chat about the benefits of facilitating active learning in their classrooms and lectures. Short videos with snippets of valuable feedback.

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“Pedagogy for active and deep learning”Kayo Matsushita (Kyoto University)

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Deepening Active Learning with Peer Instruction Kayo Matsushita (Kyoto University) “Pedagogy for active and deep learning”

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Kayo Matsushita from Kyoto University explains how active learning strategies can focus too much on the activity itself and the coverage of content. In the video she demonstrates how active learning, when combined with the theory of deep learning and peer instruction activities shape ‘deep active learning’. She proposes that the peer instructional model can further emphasise deep active learning.

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Teaching and Learning Experiences in Active Learning Classrooms: Highlights

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Teaching and Learning Services (http://www.mcgill.ca/tls/ ) has produced a series of videos that highlight how Active Learning Classrooms (ALCs) are being us…

 

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Teaching and learning in an active learning classroom at McGill University. The video shoes how a number of teachers from different faculties facilitate active learning and use the redesigned learning spaces to radically transform learning for students.

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Active Learning Classrooms @ the College of Biological Sciences

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Learn about the College of Biological Sciences’ lecture-less active learning classrooms.

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Active learning at work in Biological Sciences classroom at the University of Minnesota. The YouTube video explains the key principles for creating active learning environments and facilitating what students will DO to learn about the subject material.

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Active Learning For The College Classroom

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Donald Paulson & Jennifer Faust from California State University provide a comprehensive list of active learning strategies for improving student engagement and participation with learning. The webpage includes individual student activities, Q&A tips, strategies for giving the facilitator immediate feedback, critical thinking motivators, pair and share activities, and cooperative learning/collaborative group activities.

See on www.calstatela.edu