Quality Matters Program |

See on Scoop.itMOOCS Higher education

A not-for-profit subscription service providing tools (rubrics) and training for quality assurance of online courses. Also offers continuous improvement models for assuring the quality of online courses through peer review, professional development workshops and certification courses for instructors and online learning professionals. 

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Subscribers have access to a rubric with standards related to the sector of their choice: Higher Education, K-12 Education, Educational Publishing and Continuing and Professional Education. The professional development training offered by the program is related to the use of the rubric as a tool for assuring quality in the design of online courses.

See on www.qualitymatters.org

A rubric for assessing learning outcomes

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The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), is one of six regional associations that accredit public and private schools, colleges, and universities in the United States. This rubric is designed to assess the quality of academic learning outcomes.

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

The 5 dimensions included in the rubric include succinct but detailed information and a set of questions to help evaluate and assess the effectiveness of existing learning outcomes. This rubric and the instructions would also be useful to use as a starting point for the design of learning outcomes.

See on WASC, The Western Association of Schools and Colleges,

A rubric for assessing learning outcomes

See on Scoop.itLearning Outcomes and Constructive Alignment

The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), is one of six regional associations that accredit public and private schools, colleges, and universities in the United States. This rubric is designed to assess the quality of academic learning outcomes.

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

The 5 dimensions included in the rubric include succinct but detailed information and a set of questions to help evaluate and assess the effectiveness of existing learning outcomes. This rubric and the instructions would also be useful to use as a starting point for the design of learning outcomes.

See on WASC, The Western Association of Schools and Colleges,

Thinking critically about critical thinking in higher education

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Abstract: The literature on critical thinking in higher education is constructed around the fundamental assumption that, while regarded as essential, is neither clearly nor commonly understood. There is elsewhere evidence that academics and students have differing perceptions of what happens in university classrooms, particularly in regard to higher order thinking. This paper reports on a small-scale investigation in a Faculty of
Education at an Australian University into academic and student definitions and understandings of critical thinking. Our particular interest lay in the consistencies and disconnections assumed to exist between academic staff and students. The presumption might therefore be that staff and students perceive critical thinking in different ways and that this may limit its achievement as a critical graduate attribute.The key finding from this study, contrary to extant findings, is that academics and students did share substantively similar definitions and understandings of critical
thinking.

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This paper presents some interesting findings regarding assumptions about critical thinking in higher education. The study involves both academics and students and suprisingly there was some alignment in terms of definitions and conceptual understanding of critical thinking. The results indicate that students are more concerned with critical thinking outcomes whereas academics are more focused on the processes that underpin critical thinking. The authors suggest that emphasis on curriculum design that promotes critical thinking  will have a positive impact on both the products and processes of critical thinking.

See on academics.georgiasouthern.edu

E-learning methodologies – Guide for Designing e-learning Courses

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The purpose of this guide is to provide detailed guidance on designing and developing an e-learning course for trainers and instructional designers who are new to e-learning design. It also provides basic concepts and information on the processes and resources involved in e-learning
development, which might be of interest to capacity-development managers.The information in this guide is based on consolidated instructional design models and learning theories and was prepared in the context of the FAO Trust Fund Project GCP/GLO/279/GER entitled: 

“Improving the abilities of Regional Organizations to develop, implement and monitor food security training programmes”. The project is funded by the Government of Germany and implemented by FAO in 2011

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Are you thinking of designing an eLearning course and dont know where to start? This guide is comprehensive and well-designed, with a good balance of text, graphics and illustrations. The resource includes 5 chapter files which cover the basic concepts of e-learning, with a focus on adult learning and training. Included are tips and methodologies for creating and delivering interactive content and reference to some of the current technologies.

See on www.fao.org

An interactive Model of Learning Objectives/Outcomes

See on Scoop.itLearning Outcomes and Constructive Alignment

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

Do you understand know how to write learning outcomes/objectives? This interactive model explains concepts related to writing learning them whilst considering cognitive and knowledge dimensions. The authors describe a procedure using Bloom’s revised taxonomy (Anderson and Krathwohl 2001) that is specific to higher education. Verbs explain cognitive processes (in increasing cognitive complexity) and objects indicate types of knowledge (from concrete to metacognitive). Whilst the cognitive processes in this model are useful, the table explaining the knowledge dimensions may be confusing for some teachers. From Iowa State University Centre for Excellence in Learning & Teaching.

See on www.celt.iastate.edu

Thinking about thinking in teaching and learning…

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Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This infographic is worth a close look. Its value lies in helping teachers plan and design learning outcomes, assessment tasks and learning activities that enable learners to master lower level understanding and move toward higher order thinking and critical enquiry. It maps and explains Bloom’s learning levels and learning domains in a way that illustrates the hierarchy and relationships, however each learning level, within each domain, has embedded with a range of verbs that are not included here.

See on online.unlv.edu

Providing formative feedback to encourage learning

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From: http://otl.curtin.edu.au/local/downloads/learning_teaching/tl_handbook/tlbookchap6_2012.pdf

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This is a great article for prompting teachers to reflect on the effectiveness of the feedback they currently provide to students. It includes timely, personalised, manageable and constructive suggestions for giving and receiving formative feedback, to maximise the ‘learning payoff’. 

 

From Curtin University’s ‘Teaching and Learning at Curtin (2010)’, the article refers to Phil Race’s book ‘Making Learning Happen (2005)’, in mentioning the fine balance between the effectiveness and efficiency of both providing and receiving feedback. Good feedback helps students learn effectively and helps teachers work efficiently. 

tlbookchap6_2012.pdf

See on Scoop.itMoodling with Moodle

This is a comprehensive document that emphasises and reminds us of the value of feedback for effective learning and teaching. 

From Curtin University’s ‘Teaching and Learning at Curtin (2010)’, the article refers to Phil Race’s book ‘Making Learning Happen’, in mentioning the fine balance between the effectiveness and efficiency of both providing and receiving feedback. Good feedback helps students learn effectively and helps teachers work efficiently. The higher ‘payoff’ forms of feedback are listed as: 

self-assessment

students comparing work

individual learning development plans 

peer-marking with feedback

constructive questioning within

groups

presentations by students

verbal feedback to individuals

verbal feedback to whole class

verbal feedback to small groups

e-learning with instant feedback

group peer review

sharing model answers

small group tutorials

assessing against learning outcomes 

one-to-many email

criterion based written feedback

comments on written work

Diane Goodman‘s insight:

This is a great article for prompting teachers to reflect on the effectiveness of the feedback they currently provide to students. It includes timely, personalised, manageable and constructive suggestions for giving and receiving formative feedback, to maximise the ‘learning payoff’.

See on otl.curtin.edu.au