Chinese Women in World History conference, Taipei, July 2017

In early July 2017 two CASS members, Julia Martinez and Kate Bagnall, attended the International Conference on Chinese Women in World History conference in Taipei, Taiwan – hosted by the Institute for Modern History at Academia Sinica, Taiwan’s national research academy. The conference brought together more than 120 researchers from Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Europe, the United States and Australia for four days of stimulating papers and discussion.

Julia and Kate presented as part of a panel titled ‘Invisible Chinese women and colonial life’, one of two sessions organised by University of Queensland historian Dr Mei-fen Kuo. Julia’s paper explored Chinese women and trafficking into Manila in the 1920s and 1930s, based on research undertaken for her Future Fellowship on the history of trafficking in the Asia-Pacific region. Kate spoke on her ongoing work of uncovering the lives of Chinese women in colonial New South Wales from the 1850s to 1870s.

The conference was a great opportunity to meet and talk to historians from around the world, about the joys and challenges of researching women’s lives and about our own work as feminist scholars. It was also a great chance to sample some fantastic Taiwanese bento boxes for lunch!

Lionel Frost seminar, 28 July 2017

On Friday 28 July CASS will host visiting speaker Associate Professor Lionel Frost from Monash University. Professor Frost will present an HDR workshop on publishing strategies and a research seminar. This will be followed by a welcome lunch for Dr André Brett.

All welcome!

Date: Friday, 28 July 2017
Time: 9.30 am to 2.00 pm
Location: LHA Research Hub, Building 19, Room 2072
RSVP: For lunch catering purposes RSVP to fsteel@uow.edu.au by Monday, 24 July

Schedule:

9.30-10.30: HDR workshop by Lionel Frost, ‘Getting Published: Top Tips for HDRs’
10.30-11.00: Morning tea
11.00-12.30: Research seminar by Lionel Frost, ‘Railways and the Prosperity of the Victorian Mallee before 1930’
12.30-2.00: Lunch and formal welcome to Dr André Brett, Vice-Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellow in History

Many thanks to Simon Ville for organising Lionel’s visit.

New book by Claire Lowrie – Masters and Servants

Claire Lowrie, Masters and Servants: Cultures of Empire in the Tropics
(Manchester University Press, 2016)

Masters and servants explores the politics of colonial mastery and domestic servitude in the neighbouring British colonies of Singapore and Darwin. Through an exploration of master-servant relationships within British, white Australian and Chinese homes, this book illustrates the centrality of the domestic realm to the colonial project. It is the first comparative history of domestic service and British colonialism in the tropics, and highlights the important role which ‘houseboys’ played in colonial households in the tropics and the common preference for Chinese ‘houseboys’ throughout Southeast Asia.

For more information see:
http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9780719095337/

New book by Julia Martinez and Adrian Vickers – The Pearl Frontier

Julia Martínez and Adrian Vickers, The Pearl Frontier: Indonesian Labor and Indigenous Encounters in Australia’s Northern Trading Network (University of Hawaii Press, 2015)

Remarkable for its meticulous archival research and moving life stories, The Pearl Frontier offers a new way of imagining Australian historical connections with Indonesia. This compelling view from below of maritime mobility demonstrates how, in the colonial quest for the valuable pearl-shell, Australians came to rely on the skill and labor of Indonesian islanders, drawing them into their northern pearling trade empire.

For more information see:
http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9352-9780824840020.aspx

New book by Jane Carey and Jane Lydon – Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange

Jane Carey and Jane Lydon (eds), Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange (Routledge, 2014)

This edited collection argues for the importance of recovering Indigenous participation within global networks of imperial power and wider histories of ‘transnational’ connections. It takes up a crucial challenge for new imperial and transnational histories: to explore the historical role of colonized and subaltern communities in these processes, and their legacies in the present. Bringing together prominent and emerging scholars who have begun to explore Indigenous networks and ‘transnational’ encounters, and to consider the broader significance of ‘extra-local’ connections, exchanges and mobility for Indigenous peoples, this work engages closely with some of the key historical scholarship on transnationalism and the networks of European imperialism.

For further information see:
http://routledge-ny.com/books/details/9780415730426/