Seminar: Dr Maria Elena Indelicato

CASS invites you to a seminar with Dr Maria Elena Indelicato, Endeavour Research Fellow, University of Wollongong.

When: Thursday 26 April, 2018

Time: 4.15 – 5.00pm (informal drinks to follow)

Where: LHA Research Hub, 19.2072

Violence and the Archive: land, labour and violence in the sugar towns of North Queensland

Defined as ‘borderlands’ by Tracey Banivanua-Mar, sugar towns in North Queensland were significantly populated with a plethora of non-white ethnic minorities: Chinese, Indian, Japanese, ‘Malay’, Pacific Islanders and later southern Europeans. Instances of violence between these population groups have been recounted as if they were detached from the socio-historic conditions dictated by colonialism. Against this stance, in this paper I examine the case of three South Sea Islanders attacking a farmer in the city of Ingham in 1927. In unfolding the individual histories of those involved in the incident against the wider context of anti-Italian migration sentiment, this paper will demonstrate how the discursive rendition of the assault enabled the alleged victim to be aligned with the well-respected long-term migrants in town than the very much despised ‘new arrivals’. In so doing, this paper aims to determine how violence can be used by a racially ambiguous minority group such as Italians not much as technology of population management as a technology of belonging – that is, a means to claim the status of legitimate settlers in the country.

Bio

Dr Maria Elena Indelicato is a Lecturer in Media Studies at the Ningbo Institute of Technology, Zhejiang University. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies, University of Sydney with a thesis exploring the intersections of race and emotions in public discourses concerning ‘Asian’ international students, which was published by Routledge as Australia’s New Migrants. Indelicato is currently an Endeavour Research Fellow at the University of Wollongong and the editor of the ACRAWSA’s blog.

Jane Haggis Seminar and Launch of ‘Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash’

CASS, FRN and CCHR invite you to the following:

SEMINAR and BOOK LAUNCH

Date: Monday 19 March 2018
Seminar: 3.00pm to 4.30pm, Book Launch: 4.30pm to 5.30pm
Location: Panizzi Room, UOW Library

Associate Professor Jane Haggis: College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University

What Was the Steward Up to? Indian Women Touring Europe in the 1930s: Vernaculars of Friendship, Cosmopolitanisms and Anti-Colonialisms at the End of Empire  

Jane Haggis is an historian who combines historical analysis with social and cultural theory. Her research interests are wide, but cluster around three themes: cross-cultural encounters, affect and power in imperial and post-imperial contexts. She has published widely internationally in feminist historiography and gender and empire, and is currently leading an Australian Research Council funded project [DP 170104310 2017-2019), ‘Beyond Empire transnational religious networks & liberal cosmopolitanisms’ with Professor Margaret Allen, Professor Fiona Paisley and Professor Clare Midgley. With these scholars she recently published, Cosmopolitan Lives on the Cusp of Empire: Interfaith, Cross-Cultural and Transnational Networks, 1860-1950, Palgrave Pivot, 2017. Her long engagement with critical race studies most recently saw the publication of “Situated Knowledge or Ego (His)toire?: Memory, History and the She-Migrant in an Imaginary of ‘Terra Nullius’” Ngapartji, Ngapartji. In turn, in turn: Ego-Histoire, Europe and Indigenous Australians (ANU Lives Series in Biography, 2014). It also led to an Australian Research Council funded project (with S Schech) From Stranger to Citizen: Migration, Modernisation and Racialisation in the Making of the New Australian” (DP 0665782) results from which she most recently published in “White Australia and Otherness: The Limits to Hospitality” in Cultures in Refuge: Seeking Sanctuary in Modern Australia (2012). She is currently working on a monograph from that project, provisionally titled: Storying the borderlands: imaginaries of modernity and the refugee in Australia. The book (with S Schech) Culture and Development, (2000), pioneered a postcolonial feminist analysis of International Development and remains a seminal text.

Associate Professor Haggis will then launch:

Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash, Britain, Ireland and Australia, 1890-1920 (Routledge 2018)

Dr Sharon Crozier-De Rosa

Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash examines how women opposed to the feminist campaign for the vote in early twentieth-century Britain, Ireland, and Australia used shame as a political tool. It demonstrates just how proficient women were in employing a diverse vocabulary of emotions – drawing on concepts like embarrassment, humiliation, honour, courage, and chivalry – in the attempt to achieve their political goals. It looks at how far nationalist contexts informed each gendered emotional community at a time when British imperial networks were under extreme duress. The book presents a unique history of gender and shame which demonstrates just how versatile and ever-present this social emotion was in the feminist politics of the British Empire in the early decades of the twentieth century. It employs a fascinating new thematic lens to histories of anti-feminist/feminist entanglements by tracing national and transnational uses of emotions by women to police their own political communities. It also challenges the common notion that shame had little place in a modernizing world by revealing how far groups of patriotic womanhood, globally, deployed shame to combat the effects of feminist activism.