Regulating domestic service in colonial societies – report on the European Social Science History conference, 2018

 

In April Claire Lowrie attended the European Social Science History conference in Belfast as part of a panel on regulating domestic service in colonial societies. https://esshc.socialhistory.org/esshc-belfast-2018

Claire presented a paper on violent crimes committed by Chinese male servants in Singapore in the 1910s and 1920s. Shireen Ally gave a paper on regulating race and maternity in relation to African domestic servants in South Africa. Nitin Sinha explored how the regulation of bazaars in Calcutta in the eighteenth century impacted on Indian domestic servants. Nitin Varma discussed the failed attempts to introduce law regulating domestic service in India during the nineteenth century.

The panel was followed by a roundtable discussion with Victoria Haskins, Raffaella Sarti and Samita Sen on the concept of regulating domestic work in historical and contemporary contexts, and, in colonial and non-colonial contexts. One theme that emerged from the discussion was that while today the International Labour Organisation pressures states to regulate paid domestic work in order to protect the rights of workers, colonial era regulation often centred upon limiting the rights and personal freedoms of domestic workers.

The panel and the roundtable was organised by Nitin Sinha and Nitin Varma of as part of their European Research Council project called Servants Past. https://servantspasts.wordpress.com

 

 

Subjects and Aliens symposium, November 2017

One of CASS’s postgraduate members, Emma Bellino, reflects on our recent symposium.

On 28 November 2017, CASS hosted the Subjects and Aliens symposium. The symposium brought together scholars from the Australian National University, the University of Otago, La Trobe University and the University of Wollongong.

Until the middle of the twentieth century, residents of Australia and New Zealand were categorised by law as either ‘British subjects’ or ‘aliens’. Using these categories as a starting point, the Subject and Aliens symposium considered histories of nationality and citizenship in Australia and New Zealand over the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It explored the intersection of nationality with gender, race and ethnicity in a range of legal and social contexts.

Emma Bellino, Kate Bagnall, Sophie Couchman, Jane Carey, Kim Rubenstein, Julia Martinez and Angela Wanhalla at the Subjects and Aliens symposium, 28 November 2017

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