CASS Newsletter April/May 2022

RESEARCH SHOWCASE

On 12 April CASS co-hosted a research showcase with the Future of Rights Centre (FoRC). Lisa Slater and Michael Griffiths gave presentations on their projects involving research partnerships with Indigenous scholars and communities. Leonie Tan, Lauren Samuelsson and Claire Lowrie gave papers that delved into histories of colonial governance, food and the White Australia Policy.

 NEW BOOKS

Congratulations to CASS affiliate, Peter Gibson, whose book Made in Chinatown has been published by Sydney University Press.

The central argument of the book is that Chinese Australian furniture manufacturers and their employees were far more adaptable, and the White Australia vision less pervasive, than most histories would suggest. Peter is currently research fellow in the School of History at Nanjing University, Jiangsu, China. His book was based on his UOW PhD thesis, supervised by Julia Martínez, Jane Carey and Claire Lowrie.

Congratulations are also due to CASS Affiliate André Brett (now of Curtin University). His book, with map maker Sam van der Weerden, was published by Otago University Press. Can’t Get There from Here: New Zealand passenger rail since 1920, traces the expansion and – more commonly – the contraction of New Zealand’s passenger rail network over the last century.

CASS WORK-IN-PROGRESS SESSION

On the 28 April we held our first WIP for the year. Marie Geissler shared her chapter on ‘Indigenous Agency in the bark painting Collections at the National Museum of Australia’. Lauren Samuelsson provided the Introduction to be included with a book proposal titled A Matter of Taste: The Australian Women’s Weekly and the birth of a modern Australian food culture, 1933-1982. We will hold another WIP in the second half of the year, hopefully as a face-to-face event!

PUBLIC OUTREACH

On the 21st of April, Sharon Crozier De Rosa concluded her National Library of Australia Fellowship with a public lecture on the project, titled ‘Memory Keepers: Women activists’ strategies to preserve history’

CASS GRADUATE

In early May, Lauren Samuelsson was officially awarded her PhD. Lauren also gave a cracking Thankyou speech on behalf of all the ASSH graduates.

 

If you are a CASS member or affiliate and you have news on your research that you would like to publicise, contact Claire clowrie@uow.edu.au

 

 

 

CASS Newsletter March 2022

Upcoming Events

On 12 April CASS will co-host a research showcase with the Future of Rights Centre (FoRC). Lisa Slater, Michael Griffiths, Leonie Tan, Lauren Samuelsson and Claire Lowrie will present their work. For a list of papers and further information see our website. A full programmme with abstracts will be circulated soon.

On the 28 April the first CASS WIP (work-in-progress) will be held from 1:30-3:00.

Marie Geissler will circulate a chapter titled ‘Indigenous Agency in the bark painting Collections at the National Museum of Australia’.

Lauren Samuelsson will provide the Introduction to be included with a book proposal titled A Matter of Taste: The Australian Women’s Weekly and the birth of a modern Australian food culture, 1933-1982.

If you would like to attend (virtually or in-person) email Claire clowrie@uow.edu.au

 New Publications from CASS Members and Affiliates

Rohan Howitt’s article on ‘Māori Workers in Colonial New South Wales, c. 1803–40’ has been published in History Workshop Journal. Lauren Samuelsson’s delicious looking article titled From nutrition to glamour: The Australian Women’s Weekly’s cookery editors, 1933–1970 has been published online in History Australia.

Fellowship News

Julia T. Martínez has been appointed a 2022 Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University’s Humanities Research Centre and will take up the position in April. Congratulations Julia!

PhD success

Nick Dickie has successfully passed his Research Proposal Review for his thesis titled ‘Provost and Prisoners: The Australian military police and prisoners of war in Europe, North Africa, the Pacific and Australia during the Second World War’.

New Members

CASS has welcomed a number of new members and affiliates to the centre this year.

Rachel Macpherson has joined CASS as a UOW PhD member. Rachel is writing a thesis on ‘Australasian suffrage and the construction of alternative modern nationalisms, 1880 – 1901’. Her supervisors are Sharon Crozier De Rosa and Jane Carey.

ASSH Honorary Research Fellow, Marie Geissler, has also joined CASS. Marie’s research interests include: Indigenous knowledges, Indigenous art, Arnhem Land bark painting, Indigenous agency in cultural collections, Intercultural histories

In addition, we have two new affiliate members:

Anna Dunn, a PhD student at the University of Sydney working on a thesis titled ‘Rocky Relations: Aboriginal cultural heritage protection and recreational use in conservation areas.’

Vanessa Whittington a PhD student based at Western Sydney University, whose thesis is titled ‘Authenticities, deficits, transformations: visitor responses to Aboriginal cultural heritage in Australian protected areas.’

Please join me in welcoming our new researchers!

 

If you are a CASS member or affiliate and you have news on your research that you would like to publicise, contact Claire clowrie@uow.edu.au

 

 

Contested Histories, Unsettled Futures: CASS & FoRC Research Showcase 12 April (a hyrbid event)

Contested Histories, Unsettled Futures

The Centre for Colonial and Settler Studies (CASS) and the Future of Rights Centre (FoRC) will host this joint event to showcase research being undertaken across both Research Centres based within the School of Humanities and Social Inquiry (HSI) around the themes of past, present, and emerging historical, political, and social contentions and insecurities.

 

The event will take place on:

Tuesday 12th April from 09:45am to 3:00pm

Building 24-G02 and on Zoom

(link provided with Registration)

 

Register here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/contested-histories-unsettled-futures-tickets-302445471547

 

Event Organisers/Contacts:

A/Prof Claire Lowrie, CASS Director: clowrie@uow.edu.au

A/Prof Phil Orchard, FoRC Co-director: orchardp@uow.edu.au

A/Prof Susan Engel, FoRC Co-director: sengel@uow.edu.au

A/Prof Roger Patulny, Research Leader HSI: rpatulny@uow.edu.au

 

‘Contested Histories, Unsettled Futures’ Program
School of Humanities and Social Inquiry, ASSH, UOW, April 12, 2022

9:45 am Welcome to Country

Time Title Presenter
PART I – Contesting Colonialism: Past Present and Future (CASS)
10.00am – 10.20am Learning to Stand with Gyack A/Prof Lisa Slater, Associate Professor of Cultural Studies, HSI
10.20am – 10.40am Yaangarra: Building Digital Capacity for
the Teaching of Indigenous Literature
Dr Michael R. Griffiths, Senior Lecturer in Literary Studies, TAEM
10.40am – 11.00am Morning Tea
11.00am – 11.20am James Thornton Beckett, the First Chief Inspector of Aborigines and Settler
Colonialism in the Northern Territory
Leonie Tan, PhD Candidate in History, HSI
11.20am – 11.40am ‘Break the monotony of meat’: vegetarian messaging in the Australian Women’s
Weekly, 1933-1982
Dr Lauren Samuelsson, Honorary Fellow, History, HSI
11.40am – 12.00pm Chinese Amahs in White Australia: Domestic Workers and the Second World War A/Prof Claire Lowrie, Associate Professor History, HSI, with Charmaine Lam

12.00pm –

1.00pm

Lunch
PART II – Contested Climates and Emerging Insecurities (FoRC)
1.00pm – 1.20pm Tony Wrigley, Kenneth Pomeranz, Vaclav Smil and the missing ‘motive powers’: minimizing the contribution of wind- and water-power in the Industrial Revolution

Dr Adam Lucas, Senior Lecturer in Science and Technology Studies, HSI

 

1.20pm – 1.40pm Leading from the Pacific: Norms, Contestation, and the Issue of Climate Mobilities Protection Mr Liam Moore, HDR Candidate International Relations, HSI
1.40 – 2pm Afternoon Tea
2.00pm – 2.20pm More Debtfare than Healthcare: Business as Usual in the Multilateral Development Banks’ COVID-19 response in India A/Prof Susan Engel, Associate Professor of Politics and International Studies, HSI, with David Pedersen, HSI
2.20pm – 2.40pm Do Australians think they have a right to Universal Basic Income? Presenting evidence from the 2019-2020 Australian Social Attitudes Survey A/Prof Roger Patulny, Associate Professor of Sociology, HSI, with A/Prof Ben Spies-Butcher (Macquarie University) & Ms Maiy Azize, Anglicare Australia
2.40pm – 3.00pm Resonance and/or the Slow Apocalypse Dr Jordan McKenzie, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, HSI
3.00pm Close

 

PART I – Contesting Colonialism: Past Present and Future

Centre for Colonial and Settler Studies (CASS)

The first part of ‘Contested Histories, Unsettled Futures’ showcases presentations from the Centre for Colonial and Settler Studies (CASS), which is part of the Faculty of Arts Social Sciences and Humanities, based within the School of Humanities and Social Inquiry (HSI). The centre promotes critical inquiry into the history, theoretical framing, and contemporary legacies of colonialism on a global scale. CASS is an interdisciplinary centre bringing together researchers in history, political science, cultural studies and literary criticism. Our members include academic staff, honorary academics, and PhD students as well as external affiliates from Australia and overseas. We run a regular work-in-progress sessions as well as seminars and conferences. The focus of Part I is on bringing together the diverse work of CASS members around the theme of ‘Contesting Colonialism’, including looking at Indigenous connections to land, animals and literature, and historical accounts of colonial government figures, migrant labour, and consumption practices.

CASS Website and Twitter:

https://www.uowblogs.com/cass/

https://twitter.com/cass_uow

 

PART I – ABSTRACTS

Learning to Stand with Gyack

A/Prof Lisa Slater, Associate Professor of Cultural Studies, HSI

The project that I want to discuss is, what is affectionately called, the Corroboree Frog project. It began as a collaboration with Wolgalu and Wiradjuri First Nations community members, Brungle Tumut Local Land Council, scientists from the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) and academics from UOW.[1] Initially the aim was to revitalise the Wolgalu/Wiradjuri community’s connection to a critically endangered and culturally and ecologically significant species: the corroboree frog (Pseudophryne pengilleyi). Whom the Wolgalu nation call Gyack.[2] Over the past 18 months, the project has developed and deepened, and in the words of my Wolgalu/Wiradjuri colleague Shane Herrington, the Corroboree frog is just one (important) piece of the puzzle to revitalise Wolgalu/Wiradjuri knowledges and work to put culture at the centre of land management practices. In this paper, I want to trace the journey of the project, and where we might be heading and why. I also want to take the opportunity to reflect upon my role, but more so my place in the project, and trying to be a useful academic.

[1] I wish to acknowledge and thank the project team: Country, Gyack, Brungle-Tumut Wolgalu/Wiradjuri, Aunty Sue Bulger, Shane Herrington, Vanessa Cavanagh, Geoff Simpson, Kat Haynes, Mal Ridges & Dave Hunter.

[2] In Wolgalu there are two names that describe frogs. Gyack – because of its call – best describes the corroboree frog (Shane Herrington, pers. comm. 21st Sept 2021).

 

Yaangarra: Building Digital Capacity for the Teaching of Indigenous Literature

Dr Michael R. Griffiths, Senior Lecturer in Literary Studies, School of Arts, English and Media (TAEM)

Yaangarra Team: Evelyn Araluen Corr, Luke Patterson, Jade Kennedy, Michael Griffiths, Chrissy Howe, Ika Willis, Pascal Perez, Mehrdad Amirghasemi

Yaangarra, the Dharawal word for paperbark, is the name of a database and interactive teaching tool for working with Indigenous Literatures from Australia, designed and produced on Dharawal Country at the University of Wollongong. Our team is comprised of literary and Indigenous studies scholars Evelyn Araluen Corr (Bundjalung, Goorie/Koorie) and Luke Patterson (Kaamilaaraay); educator Jade Kennedy (Yuin); literary studies scholar Michael Griffiths; creative writer Chrissy Howe; reception studies scholar Ika Willis; and our partners in the SMART Infrastructure Facility, with the leadership of Pascal Perez and the expertise of IT Architect Mehrdad Amirghasemi. Yaangarra connects knowledge about Indigenous writers to Country, literary genre, time and story.

 

James Thornton Beckett, the First Chief Inspector of Aborigines and Settler Colonialism in the Northern Territory

Leonie Tan, PhD Candidate in History, HSI

In 1904, JT Beckett wrote an article in the Age to decry the exploitive practice of indenture in Western Australia, describing it as being akin to slavery. He argued that Aboriginal people were ‘born to a life as free and untrammelled as that of any other’ and that their protection and livelihood could not simply be ‘ordained by an act of Parliament’. Beckett was later appointed the first Chief Inspector of Aborigines in the Northern Territory and played a foundational role in the Territory’s transition to Commonwealth rule. This paper will present one of the first scholarly accounts of his life, from his early experience as an ‘overlander’ journeying across the top end and his work as a journalist in Western Australia, to understand how his experiences with Aboriginal people influenced his later work. Contextualising Beckett’s ‘expertise’ helps illuminate this early period of Aboriginal governance under Commonwealth rule in the Northern Territory

 

‘Break the monotony of meat’: vegetarian messaging in the Australian Women’s Weekly, 1933-1982

Dr Lauren Samuelsson, Honorary Fellow, History, HSI

Australia has a long history of excessive meat consumption. Colonists were once tempted to Australian shores by the promise of being able to eat meat ‘three times a day’, and commentators in the late 19th century reflected that Australians’ ‘consumption of…meat…is enormously in excess of any commonsense requirements’. Vegetarianism and veganism have been rising in popularity in Australia with around 12 per cent of the population abstaining from meat consumption. The mainstream popularity of these diets is relatively recent, however there have long been segments of the Australian population who have pushed for the uptake of a vegetarian diet, for a wide variety of reasons. As the preeminent women’s magazine of the twentieth century, the Australian Women’s Weekly (the Weekly) had an immense influence on mainstream Australian food culture. This paper seeks to investigate vegetarian messaging in the magazine between 1933 and 1982. In examining these messages, I will aim to discover the ways in which vegetarianism was integrated with the wider food culture communicated to the magazine’s readers and the underlying entanglements between vegetarianism, gender and class throughout the twentieth century. In doing so, I hope to shed light on the complex historical relationship between Australian food culture and meat eating to understand cultural barriers to the uptake of vegetarianism in Australia.

 

Chinese Amahs in White Australia: Domestic Workers and the Second World War

A/Prof Claire Lowrie, Associate Professor History, HSI, with Charmaine Lam

Between 1940 and 1942 thousands of British women and children were evacuated from Malaya and Hong Kong and sent to Australia in the context of Japanese wartime expansionism. Though it contravened the terms of the Commonwealth government’s Immigration Restriction Act (1901), some of those women were granted permission to bring their Chinese amahs (nursemaids) with them to care for their children. This paper explores the little-known story of Chinese amahs in Australia during the Second World War and their attempts to remain in the country at the conclusion of the war. It is part of an ARC Discovery Project on Ayahs and Amahs Transcolonial Servants in Australia and Britain 1780-1945 with Victoria Haskins and Swapna Banerjee.

 

PART II – Contested Climates and Emerging Insecurities 

Future of Rights Centre (FoRC)

The second part of ‘Contested Histories, Unsettled Futures’ showcases presentations from the Future of Rights Centre (FoRC), which is part of the Faculty of Arts Social Sciences and Humanities, based within the School of Humanities and Social Inquiry (HSI). FoRC brings together humanities and social science researchers interested in exploring how past and present understandings of human rights at the global, Asia-Pacific, and local levels will help to inform the future. The focus of Part II is on looking back to contest historical accounts of ‘industrial progress’ by reframing the industrial revolution around sustainable energy use, and gazing forward with optimism – looking at attitudes and possibilities for the introduction of Universal Basic Income – and pessimism – or the arrival of the ‘slow apocalypse’ …

FoRC Website and Twitter:

https://www.uow.edu.au/the-arts-social-sciences-humanities/research/future-of-rights-centre/

https://twitter.com/futureofrights

 

PART II – ABSTRACTS

Tony Wrigley, Kenneth Pomeranz, Vaclav Smil and the missing ‘motive powers’: minimizing the contribution of wind- and water-power in the Industrial Revolution

Dr Adam Lucas, Senior Lecturer in Science and Technology Studies, HSI

Neo-Malthusian demographers, economic historians and historians of technology have written copiously on the origins of the Industrial Revolution and argued that the transition to a mineral-based energy economy as a result of the extensive adoption and development of mining-based technologies in the early modern period led to socioeconomic ‘breakthroughs’ in overcoming the ‘natural limitations’ of an organic economy. Emphasizing the role of coal and steam-power in generating the economic and technological momentum to achieve this breakthrough, they have minimized, and sometimes inexplicably ignored, the contribution of wind- and water-power to the Industrial Revolution and to the development of agriculture and industry more generally. This paper presents preliminary research relating to Britain which questions these scholarly practices based on the Leverhulme Trust Project Grant, a collaboration between Dr Lucas and colleagues at the University of Glasgow

 

Leading from the Pacific: Norms, Contestation, and the Issue of Climate Mobilities Protection

Mr Liam Moore, HDR Candidate International Relations, HSI

Climate mobilities is a complex and contested area, with several overlapping and intersecting norm regimes governing it. During the Trump administration, the United States retreated from its traditional position of leadership on climate change and forced migration. This created opportunities for other actors to contest existing normative agendas. Fiji’s presidency of COP23 meant they were well placed to fill the space left by the US retreat. They offered an alternative way forward based on both their domestic policies on climate relocation and displacement, and their practices in physically relocating communities and creating innovative climate financing models. Fiji used these experiences to put forward a new arrangement of international norms. A key question, however, is whether target audiences will accept this new arrangement as legitimate. Within the Pacific, the ideas are gaining traction – Vanuatu has similar policies on climate mobilities, while New Zealand has endorsed Fiji’s climate trust fund financing model. Internationally, while Fiji has received praise from figures such as the UN Secretary General, the next test is whether their language and ideas are adopted in the forthcoming reports on climate displacement requested by President Biden’s recent executive order. If they are, it suggests that Fiji’s contestations have been successful.

 

More Debtfare than Healthcare: Business as Usual in the Multilateral Development Banks’ COVID-19 response in India

A/Prof Susan Engel, Associate Professor of Politics and International Studies, HSI, with David Pedersen, HSI

Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) have been a vital source of funds for the Global South in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in the healthcare sector. Prior to the pandemic, the big MDBs’ approach to healthcare reflected the post-Washington Consensus, that is a largely neoliberal agenda perpetuating the expansion of private healthcare markets through financialization mechanisms, though with some emphasis on a minimal level of universal healthcare. We studied the MDBs’ approaches to healthcare in India to evaluate whether the pandemic resulted in: (a) a critical reassessment of their healthcare models; (b) a business-as-usual approach; or (c) a disaster capitalism response exploiting the current socio-economic milieu to further propagate neoliberal reform. We found first, that the MDBs adopted an inadequate business-as-usual approach which is thickening the financialization of healthcare. They do this in projects that operate from the macro through to the micro level, in other words, the MDBs are promoting the multi-scalar financialization of healthcare in India that will have long-term implications for the sector. Secondly and relatedly, MDB lending is deepening debtfare which Susanne Soederberg (2014, 3) conceived as a term to describe the way neoliberal states “mediate, normalise and discipline the monetised relations that inhabit the poverty industry.”

 

Do Australians think they have a right to Universal Basic Income? Presenting evidence from the 2019-2020 Australian Social Attitudes Survey

A/Prof Roger Patulny, Associate Professor of Sociology, HSI, with A/Prof Ben Spies-Butcher (Macquarie University) & Ms Maiy Azize, Anglicare Australia

Rising inequality and insecurity have fuelled interest in basic income schemes and experiments around the world. Internationally, surveys such as the European Social Survey (ESS), have explored public attitudes to basic income, and found significant differences within and between countries based on the organisation of welfare and work. We add to this literature by presenting novel Australian data from the 2019-20 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes designed to mirror the ESS UBI question. We find that Australian attitudes are broadly in the middle of European opinion, with 51% in support of UBI, and that Australians registered a slight increase in support for UBI during the COVID-19 pandemic (consistent with other emerging evidence). We also find general support for UBI amongst young people, those not currently working (excluding retired people), those more highly educated, renters, and a range of attitudes and identifications associated with the political left. The main opposition is amongst older, less educated, retired, homeowners with more right-wing attitudes and identifications. The paper concludes with a discussion of how material versus post-material motivations intersect with political attitudes to shape perceptions that Australians have a right to Universal Basic Income.

 

Resonance and/or the Slow Apocalypse. 

Dr Jordan McKenzie, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, HSI

The ‘slow apocalypse’ (McMurry 1996) challenges Hollywood deceptions of the end of the world as a series of sudden and dramatic events that constitute a collapse of social, political and economic structures. Rather than understanding the ‘beginning of the end’ as the result of an asteroid, a nuclear bomb or a financial collapse, the concept of a slow apocalypse suggests that the deterioration of society is slow, boring and likely already underway. It also challenges the nation-centred depictions of crisis that assume a disastrous ‘end of the world’ event would happen globally and with equal impact. This is as dark as it is relatable and it calls for a new way of thinking about crisis. Traditional ideas about the apocalypse inspire heroic political or military acts that can save the day, and resourceful preppers undertaking adventures in a dangerous and exciting new landscape. But the slow apocalypse is boring, bureaucratic and dull. It is a death by a thousand cuts and it is easy to get accustomed to all the bleeding.  This is all somewhat speculative and open to interpretation, so my question here is something like ‘to what extent can a future-oriented and seemingly optimistic theory of happiness – like Hartmut Rosa’s Resonance – co-exist with a slow apocalypse?’ Is it too much to ask for a theory like Rosa’s to address a global collapse? Almost certainly. While there is much about Resonance that is agreeable and effective, what is the place for a theory of happiness in a time of real and everyday crisis? Is it an irresponsible distraction from the reality of a time where happiness has no place. Or, if this is a new normal, is it an essential component of learning to live in an apocalyptic new age?

The Centre for Colonial and Settler Studies (CASS) Newsletter November to December 2021

Here is a wrap up of some of the activities CASS people have been involved in over the last month.

CASS WIP AND FOND FARWELLS

Our last CASS work-in-progress for the year was held on 7 December. It was lovely to meet in person and very special as Claire Wright, Rohan Howitt and André Brett are all beginning new jobs in 2022. Claire Wright is leaving Macquarie University to begin her DECRA at the University of Technology Sydney. Rohan Howitt is taking up a Post-Doc in Environmental History at the Australian National University. André Brett is (sadly) leaving UOW to take up a permanent role at Curtin University. We wish them all the best in their exciting new positions.

For the WIP, Claire Wright circulated a draft article titled ‘Mythmaking: Annual reports and Australian corporate culture, 1910-2018.’  André Brett shared ‘“So Unusual, So Horrible, and So Rapid in the Fatal Result”: The Death of James Garden Ramsay and Summertime Railway Travel in Colonial Australia.’ Claire Lowrie and Rohan Howitt provided feedback.

KEYNOTES AND CONFERENCES

During November, a number of our members were invited to deliver keynotes and public lectures. On 19 November, Lisa Slater gave a keynote on ’Uncertain belonging’ for the European Australian Studies Symposium. With Adrian Vickers, Julia Martínez delivered a keynote at the Navigating Encounters and Exchanges Symposium held at the Melbourne School of Design, The University of Melbourne (24 November).

Claire Lowrie was part of a Making Public Histories seminar on ‘Child Labour and Slavery’ organised by Monash University History Program and the History Council of Victoria. She presented alongside Professor Jane Lydon (UWA) and Associate Professor Susie Protschky (Deakin). A recording of the public event is available on YouTube.

CASS members and affiliates were also involved in several conferences. Seven of our members presented their latest research at the Australian Historical Association conference, including Jane Carey, Sharon Crozier De Rosa, Amanda Harris, Claire Lowrie, Julia Martínez, Lauren Samuelsson and Claire Wright.

 HONOURS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

Congratulations to Amanda Harris whose book Representing Australian Aboriginal Music and Dance 1930-1970 (Bloomsbury 2020) was shortlisted for the Australian History Category of the 2021 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards. What an achievement!

Well done to all of the CASS members who have continued to publish their work during the course of what has been a very challenging year. A list of publications for the year can be found on the CASS website. Special mention goes to Sharon Crozier De Rosa who had a whopping 4 articles, 3 chapters and 4 book reviews published this year!

 Lisa Slater marked a major outcome of her collaborative UOW Global Challenges Grant on Cultural Burning for Resilience. On 8 December the team premiered their film from the Cultural Burning for Resilience project. This Aboriginal-led community project, brings together Aboriginal high school students with Yuin Elders and cultural land management practitioners from the South Coast to learn about good fire, bad fire, and connection to Country. 

Wishing everyone a restful summer break. See you in 2022!

 

Film Premiere: Cultural Burning for Resilience 

CASS member, Lisa Slater, is part of a UOW Global Challenges Grant team  exploring  Cultural Burning for Resilience. This film is a major project outcome. Don’t miss it!

Wednesday 8 December 2022
2PM-3PM AEDT

Link to register: https://uow-au.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_83mBZv02SZq_EPuZKVUIAw

Cultural Burning for Resilience is an Aboriginal-led community project, supported by the University of Wollongong’s Global Challenges Program and Treading Lightly Inc.  The action research project brings together Aboriginal high school students with Yuin Elders and cultural land management practitioners from the South Coast to learn about good fire, bad fire, and connection to Country. 

This beautifully edited and compelling short film demonstrates the power of hands on enquiry-based learning that celebrates cultural fire knowledge.

 “I’m pretty sure this is the best thing I’ve watched all year! God I loved it!” 
– Jaymee Beveridge, Woolyungah Indigenous Centre 

Many students involved in the project experienced the 2019/2020 bushfires firsthand. In response to the bushfires, and followed by COVID, the Cultural Burning for Resilience project was supported by the UOW Global Challenges program as part of its ‘Disaster and Crisis’ initiative, dedicating funding for interdisciplinary projects addressing disaster response in our region. Matched funding was also provided by the South Coast based NGO Treading Lightly Inc., who fund projects that build resilient communities and make positive changes for a sustainable future.

The project was a collaboration between Yuin Indigenous Elders and community – Ulladulla Local Aboriginal Land Council and local Yuin cultural fire practitioners; students from Nowra, Bomaderry, Ulladulla and Batemans High Schools; researchers from the University of Wollongong, Treading Lightly Inc.; and Mane Collective Video Production.

The project team invite you to join us for the first live screening of the film.

Claire Lowrie part of a stella line-up for a public lecture on Child Labour & Slavery

On the 25 of November, Claire Lowrie will present her research on the mui tsai controversy for the final Making Public Histories seminar for 2021. The seminar series is open to the public and organised by Monash University History Program and the History Council of Victoria. Claire will be presented alongside Professor Jane Lydon (UWA) and Associate Professor Susie Protschky (Deakin).

CASS Newsletter – August to October 2021

CASS researchers kept busy over the long lockdown period. Below are some of our key activities and achievements.

CASS Work-In-Progress Session

On the 23rd of September we met for a work-in-progress session.

Mike Griffith’s shared his draft chapter on ‘White Representations of Aboriginality in the Twentieth Century Australian Novel’ for the Cambridge History of the Australian Novel. Claire Lowrie circulated a draft of her article on ‘“A hill station for whom?”: Hill Stations and the racialized politics of coping with heat in colonial Malaya and the Philippines, 1920s-1930s.’

Thanks to (in order of zoom photo) Rohan Howitt, Julia Martínez, André Brett and Claire Wright for their excellent feedback!

DECRA and other grant successes

 Long time CASS member, Claire Wright (Macquarie University), was awarded an ARC DECRA for her project titled ‘Above the glass ceiling: Australian women in corporate leadership 1910–2020’. The project explores our understanding of business history by undertaking the first comprehensive history of women in corporate leadership in Australia across the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Well done Claire!

Lisa Slater was part of a team that won a UOW RevITAlise (RITA) Research Grant for her project ‘Re-walking and reawakening country’ (with Katharine Haynes and Phillip Byrne). 

Media

In August the Financial Review included a feature story on Simon Ville and his appointment as Harvard Chair of Australian Studies (2022-2023). You can read the story here

Book Prize – International Convention of Asian Scholars

Congratulations to Julia Martínez, Claire Lowrie, Frances Steel and Victoria Haskins, who won the Social Sciences ‘Teaching Tool Accolade’ in the 2021 International Convention of Asian Scholars Book Prizes. The accolade was awarded for their book, Colonialism and Male Domestic Service Across the Asia Pacific (Bloomsbury 2019). The book was an outcome of their ARC Discovery Project ‘Houseboys: A transcolonial history of domestic service in the Asia-Pacific’. More information on the prize and the winners can be found here

Conference Activities

A number of our members have engaged in conferences over the last few months.

Lauren Samuelsson was part of the organizing committee and a presenter for the Lilith ‘Gender in Catastrophic Times’ symposium in September.

Jane Carey was part of a panel presentation on ‘Eugenic thinking in Australasia: An Anti-Eugenics Centennial’ organised by the University of Western Australia and PEiPL (Philosophical Engagement in Public Life).

In August, Claire Lowrie and Julia Martínez presented at the International Convention of Asian Scholars. They were part of a panel on  as part of a panel on ‘Indentured Labour and Domestic Service’ with Arunima Datta (University of Idaho) and Victoria Haskins (University of Newcastle), chaired by Swapna Banerjee (CUNY).

 

If you are a CASS member or affiliate and you have news on your research that you would like to publicise, contact Claire clowrie@uow.edu.au

 

PhD research on food history featured on the ABC

Lauren Samuelsson submitted her PhD thesis, titled ‘A Matter of Taste: The Australian Women’s Weekly and the Birth of a Modern Australian Food Culture’, on the 25th of June. We were very fortunate to be able to toast her success just days before Greater Sydney went into lockdown. Lauren’s work is generating a high level of public interest. Following the submission of her thesis she was interviewed by Wendy Harmer and Robby Buck on ABC Radio Sydney and an article on her thesis was published on the ABC’s website. Lauren was also interviewed by Indira Naidoo for ABC Radio’s ‘Nightlife’ program. You can listen to the full forty-minute interview here.

André Brett wins the Max Crawford Medal

Congratulations to André Brett, UOW historian and member of the Centre for Colonial and Settler Studies (CASS), who won the Max Crawford Medal. The medal is Australia’s most prestigious award for achievement and promise in the humanities. André won the award for his work on the environmental history of railways. You can find out more about André’s award here.