Discussion Forum: Learning from Christchurch: Recognising complicity, Fighting white supremacy

All members of the University and wider community are invited to a discussion and strategy sharing session on this vital topic of our times. The event is an opportunity to come together, express solidarity and support, and especially to listen to the voices of those who have the greatest knowledge of how racism operates.

WHEN: Friday 5 April, 2.00-3.30pm

WHERE: Building 24, Room 203

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New book by Claire Lowrie – Masters and Servants

Claire Lowrie, Masters and Servants: Cultures of Empire in the Tropics
(Manchester University Press, 2016)

Masters and servants explores the politics of colonial mastery and domestic servitude in the neighbouring British colonies of Singapore and Darwin. Through an exploration of master-servant relationships within British, white Australian and Chinese homes, this book illustrates the centrality of the domestic realm to the colonial project. It is the first comparative history of domestic service and British colonialism in the tropics, and highlights the important role which ‘houseboys’ played in colonial households in the tropics and the common preference for Chinese ‘houseboys’ throughout Southeast Asia.

For more information see:
http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9780719095337/

Ann Curthoys lecture and book launch, 16 June 2016

PUBLIC LECTURE BY PROFESSOR ANN CURTHOYS

‘Looking for gender? Writing Aboriginal-settler relations into Australian political history’ by Professor Ann Curthoys, University of Sydney

Thursday 16 June, 3:30pm,
Building 19, Room 1056
University of Wollongong

Following the lecture, Professor Curthoys will launch Claire Lowrie’s new book:

Masters and Servants: Cultures of Empire in the Tropics,
Manchester University Press, 2016

Thursday 16 June 2016, 5pm
LHA Research Hub, Building 19, Room 2072
University of Wollongong

Looking for gender? Writing Aboriginal-settler relations into Australian political history
When writing colonial political history, most of the time, the historical actors we consider are male. Whether they are Indigenous leaders or pastoral labourers, missionaries, pastoralists, convicts, free immigrants, British officials, or intellectuals debating questions of Aboriginal policy and colonial governance, they are usually men. Women are always there, as members of both Indigenous and settler societies, but very rarely as visible or individually named political actors.  My lecture will explore the challenges of putting both colonialism and gender into Australian political history, creating what the anthropologist W.E.H. Stanner called “a single field of life”.

Biography
Ann Curthoys is an Honorary Professor at the University of Sydney and the University of Western Australia. She was formerly Manning Clark Professor of History at the Australian National University and an ARC Professorial Fellow at the University of Sydney. She works on Australian history in an international context, and on questions of history, theory, and historical writing. Her books include Freedom Ride: A Freedom Rider Remembers; (with John Docker) Is History Fiction?; (with Ann McGrath) How to Write History that People want to read.

 

New book by Julia Martinez and Adrian Vickers – The Pearl Frontier

Julia Martínez and Adrian Vickers, The Pearl Frontier: Indonesian Labor and Indigenous Encounters in Australia’s Northern Trading Network (University of Hawaii Press, 2015)

Remarkable for its meticulous archival research and moving life stories, The Pearl Frontier offers a new way of imagining Australian historical connections with Indonesia. This compelling view from below of maritime mobility demonstrates how, in the colonial quest for the valuable pearl-shell, Australians came to rely on the skill and labor of Indonesian islanders, drawing them into their northern pearling trade empire.

For more information see:
http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9352-9780824840020.aspx

New book by Jane Carey and Jane Lydon – Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange

Jane Carey and Jane Lydon (eds), Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange (Routledge, 2014)

This edited collection argues for the importance of recovering Indigenous participation within global networks of imperial power and wider histories of ‘transnational’ connections. It takes up a crucial challenge for new imperial and transnational histories: to explore the historical role of colonized and subaltern communities in these processes, and their legacies in the present. Bringing together prominent and emerging scholars who have begun to explore Indigenous networks and ‘transnational’ encounters, and to consider the broader significance of ‘extra-local’ connections, exchanges and mobility for Indigenous peoples, this work engages closely with some of the key historical scholarship on transnationalism and the networks of European imperialism.

For further information see:
http://routledge-ny.com/books/details/9780415730426/