More than drunkenness and disorderly bodies: the gendered pleasures of drinking cultures

Post by Gordon Waitt and Susannah Clement

Australian drinking culture is facing increasing public scrutiny in relation to health, conduct and cultural legitimacy. Australian media is flooded with reports of the crises of alcohol fuelled violence in the night time economy of cities, and statistics that suggest that younger women living in metropolitan centres are drinking as much as their male counterparts.The attention given to young metropolitan people’s binge drinking has reveal one shadier side of Australian cultures of alcohol and the quest for drunkenness and disorderly bodies. But what of rural drinking cultures?

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Reflections from AAG 2015 on the notion of slow scholarship

“So the issue,” writes Martell, “is not speed, but control over speed. … In effect what slow is reintroducing is being human and well-being.”

The above quote is one of the arguments presented in a forthcoming article in ACME: An International E-journal for Critical Geographies advocating a movement For Slow Scholarship. Written by Alison Mountz and colleagues, the article develops a feminist ethics of care that challenges the isolating effects and embodied work conditions inherent to the increasing demands placed on academics within the neoliberal university.

The collectively written article explores alternatives to the fast-paced, metric-oriented neoliberal university – an argument contextualised in: a) an examination of how “the ‘slow’ in slow scholarship is not just about time, but about structures of power and inequality”, and b) the premise that “Care work is work. It is not self-indulgent; it is radical and necessary.”

This argument defines my experience of this year’s Association of American Geographers Annual Conference in Chicago. Continue reading

Talking research through photographs: notes from the Geographical Society of NSW’s Postgraduate Networking Day

Introduction by Ellen van Holstein

Each year the Geographical Society of New South Wales invites postgraduate students from all over New South Wales to meet up and talk research. Students were invited to bring a picture and briefly present their work based on that image. The event also encouraged the exchange of advice about how to manage a PhD and how to do conferences. The University of Wollongong cohort of postgraduates was represented with ten candidates. The event was an excellent opportunity to think about the core messages of our research projects and to reflect on what it is that makes our geographical minds tick. Having ten new postgraduates start PhDs in geography at the University of Wollongong this year, it was also a great opportunities for old and new AUSCCER postgraduates to get to know each other better and to revel once again in the great wealth of research diversity that AUSCCER accommodates. To get a glimpse of that diversity please click through the photos of the ten AUSCCERites who attended the Geographical Society of New South Wales postgraduate meeting.

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Fieldwork food

Written by Lesley Head, with culinary and photographic contributions by Natascha Klocker, Olivia Dun, Ananth Gopal, Sophie-May Kerr and Lulu.

There are few things more important to successful fieldwork than food. It sustains the bodies and the community of the fieldwork team. It provides points of connection with the broader community. And in our current project on Exploring culturally diverse perspectives on Australian environments, it is an important dimension of the research itself. We are currently in the Sunraysia region of Victoria (around Robinvale and Mildura), where irrigated agriculture provides an abundance of late summer food choices. In the midst of such abundance there are puzzles and challenges – people who don’t have enough to eat, farmers who don’t eat their own produce, and widespread concerns over pesticide use and the changing political economy of Australian food. Here are some moments in our food journey so far. Continue reading

Seven contributions of cultural research to the challenges of sustainability and climate change

Lesley Head and Marie Stenseke

(An abbreviated version of this paper was published in Swedish for World Science Day (14.11.14) as Head, L. and Stenseke, M. 2014 Humanvetenskapen står för djup och förståelse In E. Mineur and B. Myrman (eds) Hela vetenskapen! 15 forskare om integrerad forskning. Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet. ISBN: 978-91-7307-245-8, pp. 26-33. Marie Stenseke is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Gothenburg)

Human and physical sciences alike have reached a convergent point on recommending urgent research on climate change’s social and cultural dimensions (Hulme 2008) since, if these are ignored, it is likely that both adaptation and mitigation responses will fail because they simply do not connect with what matters to individuals and communities (Adger et al. 2012). Increasingly, recognition of the cultural dimensions of sustainability issues goes hand in hand with calls for interdisciplinary approaches to these important problems (Seidl et al. 2013). However that cross-disciplinary collaboration is often on terms defined by the natural sciences. In this paper we seek to articulate the particular and distinctive contributions of qualitative cultural research methods in the environmental field.

We do so in order that they are understood in their own terms, and as a basis for more respectful collaborative research. For too long lone social scientists have been ‘tacked on’ to environmental management bureaucracies dominated by natural science models (Roughley 2005). Among these sole practitioners Roughley has documented a history of marginalization, despite some good intentions by management. Further, these individuals often face the misplaced expectation that their research will result in neat instrumental policy outcomes rather than a more diverse conceptual contribution (Amara et al. 2004). These issues have been encountered long before climate change dominated the agenda; for example in natural resource management, land-use planning and biodiversity conservation (Gill 2006). Continue reading

UOW researcher to investigate the experiences of parents/care-givers who take their children to Viva La Gong

Held annually each November, Wollongong’s Viva La Gong is promoted as a ‘family-friendly’ cultural festival with children’s entertainment and involvement being a main focus of the event.

In 2014 Viva La Gong will be held on Saturday 8th November at MacCabe Park and PhD Candidate Susannah Clement from the University of Wollongong’s Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research is looking to talk to parents/care-givers who plan to attend with their children. Continue reading

Meet Charles Gillon

This text originally appeared in UOW’s Research & Innovation newsletter.

Charles Gillon

Charles Gillon

As Australia’s coastal population rises with the tide, PhD candidate Charles Gillon turns his human geography lens to the master-planned estates that dot our coastline.

What are you studying?
I am a PhD Candidate at the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER), in the Department of Geography and Sustainable Communities, Faculty of Social Sciences. Continue reading

Kiwi input needed for ‘Journeying to Mardi Gras Study’

Post written by Anna de Jong

I’m heading to New Zealand’s North Island in a couple of weeks to talk with anyone planning to travel to this year’s Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade.

Following research in Australia from the 2013 Mardi Gras, I’m asking: what is the role of Mardi Gras for those living outside Sydney, in a context of changing sexual politics and citizenship? Continue reading

Meet Professor Lesley Head

Professor Lesley Head

Professor Lesley Head

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Each month we’ll introduce a new academic or PhD candidate to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Professor Lesley Head is an Australian Laureate Fellow and the Director of AUSCCER. Here she answers ten questions about what she does and AUSCCER’s work.

 

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IAG 2013 – an invaluable experience

Post by Justin Westgate

I had the opportunity to attend the Institute of Australian Geographers’ conference in July which was held in Perth. Having only recently begun doctoral studies here in Australia, and moving across from the more ‘creative’ space of design, the conference not only allowed me to get a gauge on the current landscape of research situated in Australia, but both posed and helped to answer questions about how my own research – which still draws on my creative practice background might intersect with other research strands currently being investigated. Continue reading