Meet Freya Croft

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Freya is in the first year of her PhD, initially starting her studies in history, but transferred to human geography and AUSCCER at the start of 2017. She is supervised by Associate Professor Michael Adams and Dr Jenny Atchison. In this post Freya answers some questions about her research.

Freya, about to dive the Exmouth Navy Pier at Ningaloo Reef, WA.

 

What is the focus of your research?

Photo by Alex Kydd from Ningaloo Wildlife Encounters. Tiger Shark and snorkelers in the water at Coral Bay, Ningaloo Reef, WA.

Put broadly, the topic of my research is storytelling and ocean conservation.  I’m interested in the ways in which storytelling can act as a catalyst for change and inspire stewardship of the marine environment.

I am really interested in the ways in which emotions shape the encounters humans have in marine environments and how these can be used to encourage people to alter their behaviour to be more conservation minded.  Continue reading

Meet Md. Abdul Malak

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Meet Abdul, one of our newest PhD Candidates.

Abdul moved from Bangladesh to Wollongong to begin his PhD at the end of July 2017.

Whilst only just starting out Abdul describes his research project as focusing on “vulnerability, resilience and livelihood of wetland communities of north western Bangladesh.” He is supervised by Professor Noel Castree and Dr Jenny Atchison.

Continue reading

Meet Eliza de Vet

Eliza de Vet

Eliza de Vet

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Each month we’ll introduce a new academic or PhD candidate to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Eliza de Vet is completing a PhD with AUSCCER. Here she answers questions about her research.

You’re a PhD candidate with AUSCCER and you’ll be finishing your thesis soon. What is the focus of your research?
I’m interested in everyday weather and what it means to individuals in their day-to-day life. So much climate change discussion has revolved around statistics and broad geographic settings. Yet, how climate (change) translates into the daily life of individuals is not well understood. In order to comprehend how individuals experience and respond to climate, it is first necessary to examine the tangible, the amalgamation of climate – weather. This is where my research comes in. Over the past three years I’ve worked with residents in Darwin and Melbourne, exploring the role of weather in their everyday practices. These practices relate to household chores, work, leisure, travel, food, domestic comfort etc. It’s been fascinating to observe how tropical and temperate weather creates different daily challenges and luxuries, how willing and proactive participants were to staying weather connected, and the degree of tolerance participants expressed during less-than-comfortable conditions. These and other findings show promise for individuals capacity to adapt sustainably to future environmental change. Continue reading