Children’s Play in the City: Participants needed!

Post by Kiera Kent

Kiera Kent

Kiera Kent

Currently, I am in the early stages of fieldwork. It has been fun getting to know families in Wollongong and talking about my study. I thought I would share on the AUSCCER blog a bit about my project and advertise to anyone who is interested in participating in the local area. Also, I would like to share some really great media coverage that I have had the last month!

Generally, my PhD research project is looking at play in the city. Play is often associated with children’s activities (Aitken, 2001; Skelton, 2009). Children are assumed to be playing outside of adults’ supervision and in their free time (Van der Burgt & Gustfson, 2013).  However, play is a term that has been socially and culturally constructed, and a term used by adults to understand what children are doing (Thomson & Philo, 2004). Through theorizing play, children’s geographers have tried to unravel social constructions of play, and to understand, from a children’s perspective, what exactly play means (Cloke & Jones, 2005).

Continue reading

Know yourself and pace yourself – some thoughts on the temporalities of academic writing

This is an edited version of a discussion-starter presentation used at the UWS School of Social Sciences and Psychology writing retreat in November 2013, Kangaroo Valley. Thanks to Rae Dufty-Jones for the invitation. Thanks also to the group for sharing their own experiences and processes, many of which are very different from mine.

Let me first say that in academic life no one ever gives you time to write. Even though it is a core responsibility of the scholarly endeavour, there are always endless details and demands that will crowd in and demand priority. You have to carve out that time, and you have to wrest it somehow in the midst of all those other things that would fill your days. You also have to wrest some from those who have completely legitimate demands on you – your boss, your kids, your students. So if you are making the choice of a scholarly life, you are choosing not to do some other things, and not to do everything.

Here are some thoughts on how I have done it, remembering that everyone is different. (And here are the visual aids I used in the talk.)

Continue reading

Back to the future: climate change and regional inheritances

This is the second in a series of posts by AUSCCER’s Chris Gibson on climate change and regions, building on papers presented in recent weeks at the 4th International Conference on Sustainability Transitions at ETH Zurich, the annual Institute of Australian Geographers conference at the University of Western Australia, and the 2013 National Climate Change Adaptation (NCCARF) conference in Sydney.

In my last post I made the case for focusing on regions as a scale of climate change response. In this, I wish to consider briefly the issue of how to rethink future responses in light of the past.

Regions inherit numerous legacies from previous generations: their physical infrastructure, economic base, demography, political culture, workforce skills and social mix. Regions will, with some urgency, need to assess the strengths of their institutions, rethink residential, transport and environmental planning, and document vernacular cultural assets that may prove helpful in adjusting to the ‘new normal’ of climatic extremity.

How well are we positioned to ‘retrofit’ regions, physically, economically, and culturally – and how quickly can it be done? The task is to figure out which bits of regional historical inheritances will count towards transition and adaptation, and which bits will somehow need to be jettisoned. Continue reading