Getting families moving: what makes a pedestrian friendly city for families?

By Susannah Clement & Gordon Waitt

In an age of sedentarism, obesity epidemics and increasing carbon emissions, public health experts and transport planners advocate for us to walk more for the good of our health and that of the planet. The Heart Foundation of Australia’s campaign currently gracing our television screens, radio and billboards is a prime example of this. As the ads suggest ‘to walk yourself happy, all you need is your feet’. Continue reading

In search of the innovative urban poor in the Global South

PhD Candidate Razia Sultana reflects on her fieldwork and conference trips made possible by being awarded UOW’s Global Challenges Travel Scholarship.

It is really hard to conduct research with a small HDR fund when your fieldwork is overseas!  The Global Challenges Travel Scholarship opened up a window of opportunity for me to back up my PhD field travel costs and present my research findings within an international arena. I am really fortunate to have that kind of opportunity!

Put broadly, my higher degree research addresses one of the pressing global challenges of today-that is, climate change. My field site is in Bangladesh which is one the most vulnerable countries to global climate change and faces various natural catastrophes almost every year. In particular, the issue of climate change has been complex for Dhaka– the capital city- due to frequent rural-urban migration, rapid increase of informal settlement and lack of knowledge about different mechanisms of coping and adaptive capacity of socio-economically disadvantaged. Continue reading

Meet Razia Sultana

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD Candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Meet Razia Sultana

Raiza Sultana is a second year PhD Candidate with AUSSCER. Her research is titled ‘Urban Green Infrastructure in the Global South: Adapting Slums to Climate Change in Dhaka, Bangladesh’ and is being supervised by Dr Thomas Birtchnell and Associate Professor Nick Gill. In this blog post Razia answers some questions about her research and her PhD experience so far.  Continue reading

PhD Scholarship Opportunity – Smart City Living Labs

AUSCCER and the School of Geography and Sustainable Communities have an exciting PhD Scholarship opportunity for someone interested in research on urban experimentation and the Smart City, supervised by Professor Pauline McGuirk.

Urban Experimentation and the Smart City Continue reading

Materials that linger: writing about geographies of polyester clothes

By Chris Gibson

Writing journal articles can be a real struggle. Ideas take a while to form. The writing doesn’t flow. Draft papers that muddle along in need of restructures and a bloody good edit.

But sometimes, they’re just meant to be. These are my favourite papers to write. And they often come from nowhere, like bolts of lightning. They aren’t typically pre-planned; they disrupt orderly writing plans and publications schedules. But in my experience, it is the serendipitous ones that most often make the best papers. They take little time to actually pull together, and often sail through peer review.

Elyse Stanes and I had just this experience recently. Continue reading

Meet Ryan Frazer

Ryan FrazerThe Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll introduce some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Ryan Frazer began his PhD with AUSCCER at the start of 2015. Here he answers questions about his research.

 

What is the focus of your research?

My research focuses on the experiences of Australians who volunteer with newly settled refugees. In particular, I’m interested in the politics of emotions: how emotions form the bodies of individuals, collectives and nations; how emotions have political effects and how politics affects emotions. I’m also interested in voluntary labour and its relation to citizenship, political activism and ethics. Continue reading