Spirit horses

The next minutes are completely mesmerising. The two stallions fight, fifty metres from me. Dust hangs in the air around them, their screams echo off the hills, the impact of their hoof strikes reverberates in my belly. They rear, scream, snake heads out to bite, whirl and kick.

Stallion, Kosciuszko. Image: Dr Andrea Harvey

This week The Conversation published my ‘Friday Essay’ on wild horses in Australia, and the excerpt above describes one of my many wild horse encounters. Horses are the most recent of the main species humans domesticated, and the least different (with cats) from their wild counterparts.

Australia has the largest wild horse herd in the world, 400,000 or more, spread across nearly every landscape in the country, and their presence is deeply controversial. Six thousand of them are in Kosciuszko National Park. The polarised reactions and accusations in the comments thread to my essay demonstrate entrenched views on both sides. Unfortunately, the comments often also demonstrate fairly unthinking responses, with little attention to the substance of the essay. Continue reading

Journey through Dharawal and Dhurga Indigenous landscapes – Part 1

Post written by Heather Moorcroft, Sue Feary and Michael Adams

This November Sydney will host the World Parks Congress. Held every ten years, the congress is considered one of the major events on the international conservation calendar. Thousands of delegates will come together to discuss emerging ideas on conservation as well as setting the course for the next decade’s protected area work programs. Previous congresses have not only been the catalyst for innovative strategies in conservation, charting the way for the development of new paradigms, they have also resulted in vigorous and ongoing debates, particularly on the role conservation plays in social justice and economic development of local and Indigenous peoples (see the accounts on the last Congress by Brosius (2004) and Terborgh (2004)). Continue reading