Getting families moving: what makes a pedestrian friendly city for families?

By Susannah Clement & Gordon Waitt

In an age of sedentarism, obesity epidemics and increasing carbon emissions, public health experts and transport planners advocate for us to walk more for the good of our health and that of the planet. The Heart Foundation of Australia’s campaign currently gracing our television screens, radio and billboards is a prime example of this. As the ads suggest ‘to walk yourself happy, all you need is your feet’. Continue reading

Is walking becoming redundant?

According to the most recent census data, the average Australian household owns one or more vehicles with close to 65% of the workforce traveling to work each day by car, compared to less than 4% who walk. Furthermore, according to the 2014 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Young People only 33% of children and young people walk or cycle to school, with this average dropping when they reach high school. Public health experts are continually urging us stop sitting at our desks and move more through the promotion of ‘walk to school’ days, but many are cynical of the retention and upkeep of these one-off practices. So what does this mean for our health, the sustainability of our transport systems and the relationships we have with our neighbourhoods? What does this mean for walking? Continue reading