Who makes your clothes?

A clearer picture is emerging of the impacts of the fashion industry.

It is now known to be the second most polluting industry in the world, only after oil.

Where do your clothes come from?

Where do your clothes come from?

The production of fabric and textiles consumes large amounts of water and energy, and creates huge volumes of waste.

It is responsible for countless human and non-human social and ethical violations.

It is an industry that affects us every single day.

Each year Fashion Revolution Week (18-24th April 2016) brings people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes.

Continue reading

Conversations on using assemblage thinking in geography

Conversations on using assemblage thinking in geography

Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference, Adelaide

June 29th – July 1st 2016

Call for Papers

Session Organisers: Carrie Wilkinson and Ryan Frazer, University of Wollongong

 

Geographers are increasingly interested in the possibilities afforded by thinking through assemblage. It appears to be fast becoming an essential addition to the geographer’s toolkit. At its most general, assemblage provides a way of accounting for the ordering of heterogeneous phenomena into a provisional whole. The promise of assemblage, as Müller writes, is a radical “rethinking [of] the relations between power, politics and space from a more processual, socio-material perspective” (2015, p.27). It offers a way of conceptualising forms as they gather, cohere, fracture, and disperse within an always immanent ontology. Continue reading

Leisure and pleasure: the only sustainable solution to stress

The festive season is almost upon us but many of us will find it surprisingly difficult to switch off and have a real break. E-mails, text messages, social media and all the other digital ways we are linked in, make it hard to step back and focus on what really matters – our health. Continue reading

Reviewing the 2015 IAG conference

Post by Chris Brennan-Horley

Now that a few days have passed and everyone at AUSCCER has regrouped and defrosted from IAG 2015, it’s time to reflect on our week in the National Capital. Canberra provided the full winter experience, with most nights dropping below zero and daytime temps occasionally making it into double digits. Kudos goes to Tom Measham and the conference organising committee for pre-empting the weather as we were greeted at registration with our very own IAG 2015 puffer vest! A truly functional piece of conference merch, sported by many grateful participants over the coming days.

Continue reading

Why ask questions?

Like many, I’ve recently returned from the Institute of Australian Geographers annual conference in Canberra. I listened to some terrific research papers, especially by graduate students from around the country: well conceived, carefully planned and structured, rehearsed and timed, executed with interest and sometimes pizzazz.

But the speaker’s final word does not mark the end of the performance. It is now time for questions. There is a moment of tangible nervous energy in the room.

Continue reading

Exploring Geographic Connections at the IAG annual Conference     

iag20151

July is just around the corner and that means the Institute of Australian Geographers’ annual conference is nearly here. It will be a quiet week at AUSCCER base, as 22 AUSCCERites head down to the Australian National University in Canberra to ‘Explore Geographic Connections’.

If you’re attending, be sure to catch some of AUSCCER’s most recent research and Lesley’s keynote address. You can also follow conference conversations via Twitter – #IAG2015Canberra. To view the full program, click here.

Continue reading

Talking research through photographs: notes from the Geographical Society of NSW’s Postgraduate Networking Day

Introduction by Ellen van Holstein

Each year the Geographical Society of New South Wales invites postgraduate students from all over New South Wales to meet up and talk research. Students were invited to bring a picture and briefly present their work based on that image. The event also encouraged the exchange of advice about how to manage a PhD and how to do conferences. The University of Wollongong cohort of postgraduates was represented with ten candidates. The event was an excellent opportunity to think about the core messages of our research projects and to reflect on what it is that makes our geographical minds tick. Having ten new postgraduates start PhDs in geography at the University of Wollongong this year, it was also a great opportunities for old and new AUSCCER postgraduates to get to know each other better and to revel once again in the great wealth of research diversity that AUSCCER accommodates. To get a glimpse of that diversity please click through the photos of the ten AUSCCERites who attended the Geographical Society of New South Wales postgraduate meeting.

Ellen's photo Continue reading

Entangled invasive lives. Indigenous invasive plant management in northern Australia

In this video Jennifer Atchison (and Lesley Head) discuss their research on Indigenous invasive plant management in northern Australia. This presentation was delivered at the World Parks Congress held in Sydney on 17th November 2014 in a special themed session on Indigenous people and invasive species organised by Judy Fischer, Emilie Ens and Oliver Costello.

Discrepancies between the purist, warlike policy discourse of invasive plant management and the messy realities of on-ground practice are being noted in an increasing number of studies. Nowhere is this clearer than in the extensive indigenous lands of Australia’s tropical north, where communities have increasing responsibility for invasive plant management among other pressing land management tasks, as part of what Richie Howitt and others call ‘New Geographies of Coexistence’. Drawing on our own ethnographic research and an analysis of the grey literature, we describe an emerging assemblage we call Indigenous Invasive Plant Management (IIPM).

AAG 2014 Tampa Conference, Day 2: Thoughts From The Bar

By Chantel Carr

Chantel is a PhD Candidate with the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research. She is currently at the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting in Tampa, Florida.

A nice evening wander back to the hotel bar tonight, via a quick pit stop at the taco bar. Cheap! Another night for ranging across topics and thoughts spurred by the day’s diverse conference sessions – so far Ellen’s recount of a plenary about epigenetics, discussions about urban morphology and materials, ‘selfies’ and what it’s like to live in different places, making new friends and learning from the local. A somewhat calm recap of what has been a great day. Continue reading