Making space for writing: geography and research writing

RGS-IBG ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2016
Royal Geographical Society, London

30th August – 3rd September 2016

Call for Papers

Making space for writing: geography and research writing

Sponsored by the Higher Education Research Group of the RGS-IBG

Session Organisers: Rae Dufty-Jones (Western Sydney University) and Chris Gibson (University of Wollongong)

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Reviewing the 2015 IAG conference

Post by Chris Brennan-Horley

Now that a few days have passed and everyone at AUSCCER has regrouped and defrosted from IAG 2015, it’s time to reflect on our week in the National Capital. Canberra provided the full winter experience, with most nights dropping below zero and daytime temps occasionally making it into double digits. Kudos goes to Tom Measham and the conference organising committee for pre-empting the weather as we were greeted at registration with our very own IAG 2015 puffer vest! A truly functional piece of conference merch, sported by many grateful participants over the coming days.

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Why ask questions?

Like many, I’ve recently returned from the Institute of Australian Geographers annual conference in Canberra. I listened to some terrific research papers, especially by graduate students from around the country: well conceived, carefully planned and structured, rehearsed and timed, executed with interest and sometimes pizzazz.

But the speaker’s final word does not mark the end of the performance. It is now time for questions. There is a moment of tangible nervous energy in the room.

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Exploring Geographic Connections at the IAG annual Conference     

iag20151

July is just around the corner and that means the Institute of Australian Geographers’ annual conference is nearly here. It will be a quiet week at AUSCCER base, as 22 AUSCCERites head down to the Australian National University in Canberra to ‘Explore Geographic Connections’.

If you’re attending, be sure to catch some of AUSCCER’s most recent research and Lesley’s keynote address. You can also follow conference conversations via Twitter – #IAG2015Canberra. To view the full program, click here.

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Reflections from AAG 2015 on the notion of slow scholarship

“So the issue,” writes Martell, “is not speed, but control over speed. … In effect what slow is reintroducing is being human and well-being.”

The above quote is one of the arguments presented in a forthcoming article in ACME: An International E-journal for Critical Geographies advocating a movement For Slow Scholarship. Written by Alison Mountz and colleagues, the article develops a feminist ethics of care that challenges the isolating effects and embodied work conditions inherent to the increasing demands placed on academics within the neoliberal university.

The collectively written article explores alternatives to the fast-paced, metric-oriented neoliberal university – an argument contextualised in: a) an examination of how “the ‘slow’ in slow scholarship is not just about time, but about structures of power and inequality”, and b) the premise that “Care work is work. It is not self-indulgent; it is radical and necessary.”

This argument defines my experience of this year’s Association of American Geographers Annual Conference in Chicago. Continue reading

Chicago here we come!

We are two weeks away from one of geography’s largest conferences – the Association of American Geographers, held this year in Chicago, Illinois.  A dozen AUSCCERites will be presenting some of their latest work, from Mining and Sex Work, to Indigenous Invasive Plant Management in Northern Australia.

If you’re attending the conference, keep an eye out for the following speakers and session times. If you’re not lucky enough to find yourself in Chicago, make sure you keep up to date with the latest discussions by following #AAG2015 on Twitter. Continue reading

Call for interest in a rural natural resource management session for IAG 2015

The Institute of Australia Geography 2015 conference organisers are calling for session proposals. We are looking to provide a forum for environmental geographers and others working on natural resource and environmental management in rural areas, but we need your interest to put the session up! Our proposed session outline is below. If you are interested, please send us your paper titles as detailed below.

Natural resource management, land use change, and governance in peri-urban and high amenity rural areas: Taking stock.

Shaun McKiernan and Nicholas Gill, University of Wollongong

In 2012 Abrams et al reviewed the environmental implications of amenity migration to rural areas, concluding that it ‘is perhaps best conceptualised as a redistribution of (variably-defined) environmental harms and benefits at multiple scales, due to….[the] consequences of the uneven processes of recreating rural places’. Continue reading

Entangled invasive lives. Indigenous invasive plant management in northern Australia

In this video Jennifer Atchison (and Lesley Head) discuss their research on Indigenous invasive plant management in northern Australia. This presentation was delivered at the World Parks Congress held in Sydney on 17th November 2014 in a special themed session on Indigenous people and invasive species organised by Judy Fischer, Emilie Ens and Oliver Costello.

Discrepancies between the purist, warlike policy discourse of invasive plant management and the messy realities of on-ground practice are being noted in an increasing number of studies. Nowhere is this clearer than in the extensive indigenous lands of Australia’s tropical north, where communities have increasing responsibility for invasive plant management among other pressing land management tasks, as part of what Richie Howitt and others call ‘New Geographies of Coexistence’. Drawing on our own ethnographic research and an analysis of the grey literature, we describe an emerging assemblage we call Indigenous Invasive Plant Management (IIPM).