In search of the innovative urban poor in the Global South

PhD Candidate Razia Sultana reflects on her fieldwork and conference trips made possible by being awarded UOW’s Global Challenges Travel Scholarship.

It is really hard to conduct research with a small HDR fund when your fieldwork is overseas!  The Global Challenges Travel Scholarship opened up a window of opportunity for me to back up my PhD field travel costs and present my research findings within an international arena. I am really fortunate to have that kind of opportunity!

Put broadly, my higher degree research addresses one of the pressing global challenges of today-that is, climate change. My field site is in Bangladesh which is one the most vulnerable countries to global climate change and faces various natural catastrophes almost every year. In particular, the issue of climate change has been complex for Dhaka– the capital city- due to frequent rural-urban migration, rapid increase of informal settlement and lack of knowledge about different mechanisms of coping and adaptive capacity of socio-economically disadvantaged. Continue reading

Extended Deadline: 2018 Housing Theory Symposium

2018 Housing Theory Symposium Call For Papers

The Financialisation of Housing

School of Geography and Sustainable Communities, University of Wollongong

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5-6 February, 2018

Convenors: Nicole Cook and Charles Gillon

The School of Geography and Sustainable Communities is very excited to be hosting the 2018 instalment of the Housing Theory Symposium, centred on the theme of ‘The Financialisation of Housing’.

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RGS-IBG 2017 Annual International Conference London – who, what, where and when

The Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers 2017 Annual International Conference is being held in London from Tuesday 29th August to Friday 1st September. This year the conference theme is ‘Decolonising geographical knowledges: opening geography out to the world‘.

Listed below are the AUSCCER crew who will be attending, chairing sessions, authoring and presenting papers.

You can follow the conference proceedings on twitter with the hashtag #RGSIBG2017 or via their personal twitter handles.

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Housing and Home Unbound: from conference session to edited collection

Interstitial #1, Thrown-togetherness, 2015 Andrew Gorman-Murray

By Nicole Cook

In 2014, Louise Crabtree, Aidan Davison and I put out a call for papers for a session on housing and home at the Institution of Australian Geographers conference in Melbourne. We were interested in thinking about how socio-material and more-than-human geographies were changing the way that housing and home were being conceptualised, and what this meant for the politics of dwelling. These lenses had drawn our attention to many of the hidden and diverse elements gathered together in the achievement of home and the sometimes uncomfortable politics that these hidden geographies reveal: for instance in connecting owner-occupation in Australia to settler-colonialism. Among the many excellent abstracts that were submitted in response to the call, we had an email from editors at Routledge asking us if we would like to work with them to turn the session into an edited collection. We didn’t realise that editors often approach session organisers, or that we weren’t the only session to be targeted. So feeling slightly flattered, we decided we’d say yes and see how the journey unfolded.

Fast forward to 2017, and the text from that session was launched at the Brisbane IAG: Housing and Home Unbound: Intersections in Economics, Environment and Politics in Australia. Continue reading

AUSCCER at the IAG Brisbane 2017

Next week fourteen AUSCCER and fellow UOW researchers will be presenting at the Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference hosted by the University of Queensland in (hopefully) sunny Brisbane. With concurrent sessions it’s easy to miss something, so we’ve put together a rundown of the AUSCCER schedule (follow the links for abstracts).

You can follow our AUSCCERites conference trip on Twitter via their personal handles, @AUSCCER or with the hashtag #IAG2017

 

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AUSCCER @ the AAG 2017 Boston

 

Association of American Geographers’ Annual Meeting

Boston, Massachusetts, USA

5th – 9th April 2017

 

Next week from the 5th – 9th April eight AUSCCER staff and postgrads will be attending the Association of American Geographers’ (AAG) Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

From papers and discussions on parenting, sharks, natural disasters, to urban development, we sure are a diverse group! We’ve trawled through the extensive program so you don’t have too. Catch them speaking at the sessions and times listed below.

If you’re not attending the AAG, you can follow the conversation via twitter using #AAG2017, following @AUSCCER or checking out each AUSCCERites’ twitter handles.

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AUSCCER’s Guide to the IAG 2016

IAG LogoInstitute of Australian Geographers Conference 2016

‘Frontiers of Geographical Knowledge’

29th June – 1st July, Adelaide, South Australia

 

 

 

Next week, 11 AUSCCERites will be attending the annual Institute of Australian Geographers Conference in Adelaide, South Australia.

The full program for the conference is available here, but with so many UOW speakers we’ve put together ‘AUSCCER’s Guide to the IAG’ so you don’t miss a thing!

If you’re not attending the IAG, you can follow the conversation via twitter using #IAG2016 or AUSCCERites’ twitter handles (see below).

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AAG Conference 2016 San Francisco – AUSCCER Program

AAGAssociation of American Geographers’ Conference

San Francisco

29 March – 2 April

 

Next week, 15 AUSCCERites will be attending the annual Association of American Geographers conference in cool but sunny San Franciso (have those jackets ready!).

AUSCCER’s academics and PhD candidates will be sharing their latest work, including research into:

  • food and household sustainability
  • geographies of making
  • freediving
  • community gardens
  • shared living spaces in the city
  • assemblages of mobility
  • anxieties of distant labour
  • gender and wildfire

A list of AUSCCER presentations, panel and discussion sessions can be found below.

If you’re not attending the AAG, you can follow the conversation via twitter using #AAG2016 or AUSCCERites’ twitter handles (see below).

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Conversations on using assemblage thinking in geography

Conversations on using assemblage thinking in geography

Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference, Adelaide

June 29th – July 1st 2016

Call for Papers

Session Organisers: Carrie Wilkinson and Ryan Frazer, University of Wollongong

 

Geographers are increasingly interested in the possibilities afforded by thinking through assemblage. It appears to be fast becoming an essential addition to the geographer’s toolkit. At its most general, assemblage provides a way of accounting for the ordering of heterogeneous phenomena into a provisional whole. The promise of assemblage, as Müller writes, is a radical “rethinking [of] the relations between power, politics and space from a more processual, socio-material perspective” (2015, p.27). It offers a way of conceptualising forms as they gather, cohere, fracture, and disperse within an always immanent ontology. Continue reading

Responding to the ‘refugee crisis’: critical geographies and the politics of support

RGS-IBG ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2016

Royal Geographical Society, London

30th August – 3rd September 2016

Call for Papers

 

Responding to the ‘refugee crisis’: critical geographies and the politics of support

Session Organisers: Jonathan Darling (University of Manchester) and Ryan Frazer (University of Wollongong)

 

The last year has seen political and popular discussions of migration dominated by a language of ‘crisis’ and emergency response. From the ongoing securitisation of the Calais freight terminal, to the production of new border walls in Europe, policies on migration over the last year have focused on extending trends of extraterritorial exclusion, political distancing, and the deferral of moral responsibility. Yet at the same time, the mass movement of refugees witnessed in Europe has raised profound questions over the desirability, and effectiveness, of these responses.

Syrian refugees strike at the platform

Syrian refugees strike at the platform of Budapest Keleti railway station, Hungary, 4 September 2015. Photo by Mstyslav Chernov.

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