Meet Ren Hu

Ren Hu

Ren Hu

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll introduce some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Ren Hu began his PhD with AUSCCER at the start of 2015. Here he answers questions about his research.

 

  1. You’ve just begun your PhD candidature within AUSCCER. What is the focus of your research?

My focus is Illawarra dairy farmers. So far, I’ve been reading about the historical background of farming in order to dig up why the majority of Australian farmers live in a kind of economic hardship. Farmers here do not simply represent an occupation, but represent a class of people who are disadvantaged in the global capitalist system.

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Meet Lance Barrie

Lance Barrie

Lance Barrie

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll introduce some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Lance Barrie began his PhD with AUSCCER at the start of 2015. Here he answers questions about his research.

 

You’re in the early stages of your PhD candidature. How would you describe the focus of your research?

My research will explore the lived experience of cycling in Wollongong. I find cycling culture and the people that cycle really interesting and would like to capture in my research the visceral and sensorial experiences of riding. Cyclists are generally viewed by the media and some community members as second class citizens when using shared roads, and part of the reason for this is the discourse around cycling. A lot of cycling research takes a positivist approach and discusses cycling and cyclists in a particular way, categorising and grouping them using traditional methodologies such as surveys and using static measures such as distance travelled. In my PhD, I hope to take a step back; Instead of having a pre-conceived idea about what cycling is or who cyclists are, I will explore what cyclists’ bodies do.

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Meet Ryan Frazer

Ryan FrazerThe Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll introduce some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Ryan Frazer began his PhD with AUSCCER at the start of 2015. Here he answers questions about his research.

 

What is the focus of your research?

My research focuses on the experiences of Australians who volunteer with newly settled refugees. In particular, I’m interested in the politics of emotions: how emotions form the bodies of individuals, collectives and nations; how emotions have political effects and how politics affects emotions. I’m also interested in voluntary labour and its relation to citizenship, political activism and ethics. Continue reading

Talking research through photographs: notes from the Geographical Society of NSW’s Postgraduate Networking Day

Introduction by Ellen van Holstein

Each year the Geographical Society of New South Wales invites postgraduate students from all over New South Wales to meet up and talk research. Students were invited to bring a picture and briefly present their work based on that image. The event also encouraged the exchange of advice about how to manage a PhD and how to do conferences. The University of Wollongong cohort of postgraduates was represented with ten candidates. The event was an excellent opportunity to think about the core messages of our research projects and to reflect on what it is that makes our geographical minds tick. Having ten new postgraduates start PhDs in geography at the University of Wollongong this year, it was also a great opportunities for old and new AUSCCER postgraduates to get to know each other better and to revel once again in the great wealth of research diversity that AUSCCER accommodates. To get a glimpse of that diversity please click through the photos of the ten AUSCCERites who attended the Geographical Society of New South Wales postgraduate meeting.

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Call for interest in a rural natural resource management session for IAG 2015

The Institute of Australia Geography 2015 conference organisers are calling for session proposals. We are looking to provide a forum for environmental geographers and others working on natural resource and environmental management in rural areas, but we need your interest to put the session up! Our proposed session outline is below. If you are interested, please send us your paper titles as detailed below.

Natural resource management, land use change, and governance in peri-urban and high amenity rural areas: Taking stock.

Shaun McKiernan and Nicholas Gill, University of Wollongong

In 2012 Abrams et al reviewed the environmental implications of amenity migration to rural areas, concluding that it ‘is perhaps best conceptualised as a redistribution of (variably-defined) environmental harms and benefits at multiple scales, due to….[the] consequences of the uneven processes of recreating rural places’. Continue reading

Meet Charles Gillon

This text originally appeared in UOW’s Research & Innovation newsletter.

Charles Gillon

Charles Gillon

As Australia’s coastal population rises with the tide, PhD candidate Charles Gillon turns his human geography lens to the master-planned estates that dot our coastline.

What are you studying?
I am a PhD Candidate at the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER), in the Department of Geography and Sustainable Communities, Faculty of Social Sciences. Continue reading

Meet Elin Slätmo – a visitor to AUSCCER

Elin Slätmo

Elin Slätmo

Elin Slätmo is a PhD student in human geography at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. She is visiting the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) between October and December this year. In this post Elin answers a few questions about her time in Australia. Continue reading

Meet Eliza de Vet

Eliza de Vet

Eliza de Vet

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Each month we’ll introduce a new academic or PhD candidate to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Eliza de Vet is completing a PhD with AUSCCER. Here she answers questions about her research.

You’re a PhD candidate with AUSCCER and you’ll be finishing your thesis soon. What is the focus of your research?
I’m interested in everyday weather and what it means to individuals in their day-to-day life. So much climate change discussion has revolved around statistics and broad geographic settings. Yet, how climate (change) translates into the daily life of individuals is not well understood. In order to comprehend how individuals experience and respond to climate, it is first necessary to examine the tangible, the amalgamation of climate – weather. This is where my research comes in. Over the past three years I’ve worked with residents in Darwin and Melbourne, exploring the role of weather in their everyday practices. These practices relate to household chores, work, leisure, travel, food, domestic comfort etc. It’s been fascinating to observe how tropical and temperate weather creates different daily challenges and luxuries, how willing and proactive participants were to staying weather connected, and the degree of tolerance participants expressed during less-than-comfortable conditions. These and other findings show promise for individuals capacity to adapt sustainably to future environmental change. Continue reading

Meet Professor Lesley Head

Professor Lesley Head

Professor Lesley Head

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Each month we’ll introduce a new academic or PhD candidate to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Professor Lesley Head is an Australian Laureate Fellow and the Director of AUSCCER. Here she answers ten questions about what she does and AUSCCER’s work.

 

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