New media for transmitting Pacific stories: podcasting and audio recording

Post written by Dr Anja Kanngieser

On the 5th and 6th of January, Climates of Listening held a podcasting workshop in collaboration with the Poetry Shop Fiji and the Oceania Centre for Arts, Culture and Pacific Studies. The two-day workshop saw the production of four initial podcasts, which were met with enthusiastic response from around Oceania.

The use of media, particularly radio, casts a long, popular and expansive legacy across the Pacific; as a means for news reporting, in warning systems, for low fi communication and as a fixture in arts and culture. More recently, attention has been on the possibilities of social media for transmitting stories about climate change, community organizing and resistance. Given this history and connection to broadcasting, and the strong role of storytelling and narrative in Fijian and wider Pasifika cultures, podcasting and audio recording follows a substantial lineage of practices. Podcasting, quite simply, a digital audio recorded file that is placed online, most often made into a series which people can subscribe to, is commonly linked to the move from analogue to digital radio. It is also a cheap and relatively easy means to record and transmit audio even with intermittent or slow Internet, an issue faced across the region. Continue reading

Volunteer Airport Ambassadors

By Leigh Robinson

The major airports in Australia and some overseas countries, such as New Zealand and the USA, are assisted in their passenger mobilities by dedicated teams of volunteers who are generally referred to as airport ambassadors. These volunteer ambassadors play an important role in the daily functioning of major airport terminals by providing assistance and information to the mobile public as they transit through the sophisticated socio-technical systems that comprise the airport terminal.

Volunteer ambassadors at Sydney Airport

Volunteer ambassadors at Sydney Airport

Non-commercial interfacing with the travellers and visitors in the public spaces and some secure areas of the airport terminals is conducted by the volunteers under the supervision of each airport’s management. My study is investigating the psychological effects of the airport terminal (treated as a geographical place) on the ability of the volunteers to carry out their roles and upon their daily lives. The incidence of the effect of ‘place’ on the volunteers is being investigated as is the impact of it on the operation of a major airport terminal. In doing so, in my thesis I will also debate the perception of airports being placeless entities in the light of the involvement or otherwise of those working within the terminal space of the airports. Continue reading

Meet Scott McKinnon

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD Candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Dr Scott McKinnon is a Vice-Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellow who joined AUSCCER in March 2017. In this blog post Scott shares his research interests, current projects and some sage advice for PhD students.

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Meet Razia Sultana

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD Candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Meet Razia Sultana

Raiza Sultana is a second year PhD Candidate with AUSSCER. Her research is titled ‘Urban Green Infrastructure in the Global South: Adapting Slums to Climate Change in Dhaka, Bangladesh’ and is being supervised by Dr Thomas Birtchnell and Associate Professor Nick Gill. In this blog post Razia answers some questions about her research and her PhD experience so far.  Continue reading

Meet Andrew Glover

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Dr Andrew Glover is a visiting Research Fellow from RMIT University, Melbourne. In this blog post he answers some questions about his research.

What are your research interests?

Broadly, I’m interested in social practices as they relate to sustainability. That means I’m interested in how and why we move, both physically and digitally, because these inevitably have implications for the resources we use and the environmental impact we have. I’m also interested in the sociology of consumption and waste. Continue reading

Meet Freya Croft

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Freya is in the first year of her PhD, initially starting her studies in history, but transferred to human geography and AUSCCER at the start of 2017. She is supervised by Associate Professor Michael Adams and Dr Jenny Atchison. In this post Freya answers some questions about her research.

Freya, about to dive the Exmouth Navy Pier at Ningaloo Reef, WA.

 

What is the focus of your research?

Photo by Alex Kydd from Ningaloo Wildlife Encounters. Tiger Shark and snorkelers in the water at Coral Bay, Ningaloo Reef, WA.

Put broadly, the topic of my research is storytelling and ocean conservation.  I’m interested in the ways in which storytelling can act as a catalyst for change and inspire stewardship of the marine environment.

I am really interested in the ways in which emotions shape the encounters humans have in marine environments and how these can be used to encourage people to alter their behaviour to be more conservation minded.  Continue reading

Meet Md. Abdul Malak

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll be introducing some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Meet Abdul, one of our newest PhD Candidates.

Abdul moved from Bangladesh to Wollongong to begin his PhD at the end of July 2017.

Whilst only just starting out Abdul describes his research project as focusing on “vulnerability, resilience and livelihood of wetland communities of north western Bangladesh.” He is supervised by Professor Noel Castree and Dr Jenny Atchison.

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Meet Kiera Kent

Kiera Kent

Kiera Kent

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll introduce some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Kiera began her PhD with AUSCCER at the start of 2014. Here she answers questions about her research.

 

You’re in the second year of your PhD. What is the focus of your PhD research?

My research looks at where and how children play in the city. For example, built playgrounds are common spaces that represent ‘children’s spaces’ in the city. Playgrounds can provide a lot of play opportunities for children; however, when talking to children about where they prefer to play, research has shown that children will often talk about informal spaces in their neighbourhood or near their school. For example, a favourite tree to climb. When creating city spaces with children in mind, these everyday play spaces are more challenging to plan and design.  This is where my current research interest lies.

The playground at Brighton Lawn/Belmore Basin is one location where children are often seen playing. This is a regional playground meaning that it is larger, and has more play opportunities.

The playground at Brighton Lawn/Belmore Basin is one location where children are often seen playing. This is a regional playground meaning that it is larger, and has more play opportunities.

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Meet Sophie-May Kerr

Sophie-May Kerr (photo credit - Anthony Kerr)

Sophie-May Kerr (photo credit – Anthony Kerr)

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll introduce some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Sophie-May Kerr began her PhD with AUSCCER at the start of 2015. Here she answers questions about her research.

 

You’ve just begun your PhD candidature within AUSCCER. What is the focus of your PhD research?

I’m interested in social and environmental transformations that address high carbon and space-intensive urban lifestyles. In a climate changing world, one way in which cities are changing to accommodate for population growth and an increased demand in housing is through a shift towards urban consolidation. My goal is to inform understandings of sustainable urban living by examining sharing as a sustainable practice. My research will focus on the way urban residents share space (for instance, by living in apartments) and material resources (such as vehicles and household items). Responses to the challenges of urban population growth and carbon intensive lifestyles need to be grounded in an understanding of everyday life and efforts to increase rates of apartment-living must be informed by an understanding of how this mode of living can become socially sustainable. A key aspect of the research will be to consider how high-rise apartments might be made an attractive long-term residential option for a diverse population, including families. My research will focus on sustainability at the household level – understanding the everyday experiences of living in an apartment and the ways people consume material resources and inhabit spaces. I am interested in building form and layout and the strategies families have for making effective and efficient use of small spaces. An important part of this study will be exploring the discourses around raising children in apartments and the way this is portrayed, represented and stereotyped. Whilst living in apartments with children is not yet the norm in the Australian context, many cities around the world have high rates of apartment living, including families and there are no doubt lessons to be learned from these contexts.

Photo credit - Anthony Kerr

Photo credit – Anthony Kerr

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Meet Carrie Wilkinson

Carrie Wilkinson

Carrie Wilkinson

The Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) is a teaching and research group focusing on cultural and social aspects of environmental issues. AUSCCER’s expertise and research is wide-ranging. Over the next few months we’ll introduce some of our academics and PhD candidates to give greater insight into AUSCCER’s work.

Carrie Wilkinson began her PhD with AUSCCER at the start of 2015. Here she answers questions about her research.

 

You’re in the early stages of your PhD candidature. How would you describe the focus of your research?

My current doctoral research focuses on the agency, assemblages and materiality of water and water tanks in everyday life. Specifically, I am interested in learning from the everyday water experiences and practices of households which subsist on non-mains water sources – such as bore water, rainwater, river water and/or dam water – in peri-urban bushfire prone landscapes.

Tank water households are largely self-sufficient in terms of gathering, storing, conserving, recycling and disposing of water for household consumption and I am interested in what emerges through residents’ narratives of life with water tanks and tank water, and life without mains water supplies. By taking seriously the vitality of water and water tanks I want to better understand the vulnerabilities and adaptive capacities of tank-water households in a changing climate, where events such as drought and bushfire are expected to increase pressure on water supplies in future.

 “Whitewashed house with corrugated iron roof and water tank, Hill End” c.1870-1875 (Source: State Library of NSW, image by American and Australasian Photographic Company).  What do we know about water tanks?  What can we learn from water tanks? How do we “know” water tanks? I want to provide an historical context and theoretical framework for understanding contemporary Australian water- and water tank-relations. To do so, I have been exploring the catalogues of Australia’s libraries, museums and newspapers to find resources such as photographs, legislation, editorials and so forth relating to different perspectives and times of water abundance and scarcity, and different attitudes to storing and using water and water tanks in Australia.

“Whitewashed house with corrugated iron roof and water tank, Hill End” c.1870-1875 (Source: State Library of NSW, image by American and Australasian Photographic Company).
What do we know about water tanks? What can we learn from water tanks? How do we “know” water tanks? I want to provide an historical context and theoretical framework for understanding contemporary Australian water- and water tank-relations. To do so, I have been exploring the catalogues of Australia’s libraries, museums and newspapers to find resources such as photographs, legislation, editorials and so forth relating to different perspectives and times of water abundance and scarcity, and different attitudes to storing and using water and water tanks in Australia.

 

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