Housing and Home Unbound: from conference session to edited collection

Interstitial #1, Thrown-togetherness, 2015 Andrew Gorman-Murray

By Nicole Cook

In 2014, Louise Crabtree, Aidan Davison and I put out a call for papers for a session on housing and home at the Institution of Australian Geographers conference in Melbourne. We were interested in thinking about how socio-material and more-than-human geographies were changing the way that housing and home were being conceptualised, and what this meant for the politics of dwelling. These lenses had drawn our attention to many of the hidden and diverse elements gathered together in the achievement of home and the sometimes uncomfortable politics that these hidden geographies reveal: for instance in connecting owner-occupation in Australia to settler-colonialism. Among the many excellent abstracts that were submitted in response to the call, we had an email from editors at Routledge asking us if we would like to work with them to turn the session into an edited collection. We didn’t realise that editors often approach session organisers, or that we weren’t the only session to be targeted. So feeling slightly flattered, we decided we’d say yes and see how the journey unfolded.

Fast forward to 2017, and the text from that session was launched at the Brisbane IAG: Housing and Home Unbound: Intersections in Economics, Environment and Politics in Australia. Continue reading

Materials that linger: writing about geographies of polyester clothes

By Chris Gibson

Writing journal articles can be a real struggle. Ideas take a while to form. The writing doesn’t flow. Draft papers that muddle along in need of restructures and a bloody good edit.

But sometimes, they’re just meant to be. These are my favourite papers to write. And they often come from nowhere, like bolts of lightning. They aren’t typically pre-planned; they disrupt orderly writing plans and publications schedules. But in my experience, it is the serendipitous ones that most often make the best papers. They take little time to actually pull together, and often sail through peer review.

Elyse Stanes and I had just this experience recently. Continue reading