AUSCCER @ the AAG 2017 Boston

 

Association of American Geographers’ Annual Meeting

Boston, Massachusetts, USA

5th – 9th April 2017

 

Next week from the 5th – 9th April eight AUSCCER staff and postgrads will be attending the Association of American Geographers’ (AAG) Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

From papers and discussions on parenting, sharks, natural disasters, to urban development, we sure are a diverse group! We’ve trawled through the extensive program so you don’t have too. Catch them speaking at the sessions and times listed below.

If you’re not attending the AAG, you can follow the conversation via twitter using #AAG2017, following @AUSCCER or checking out each AUSCCERites’ twitter handles.

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‘And then the sea came back’ – using sound art to tell stories of climate change

AUSCCER’s Anja Kanngieser talks about her sound art piece telling stories of climate change:

“To recall the day that the earthquake happened is to recall the immensity of devastation, beyond what one could imagine, beyond what words could explain. I can’t even tell you, I can’t find the language to convey the scenes of that day… There was a vacuum, a vacuum of air, of understanding, of words. And then of course there wasn’t. And then of course the sea came back. And it told its own story”

In 2016 I was commissioned by ABC Radio National’s sound art program Soundproof to make a radio work about climate change. Working with audio-visual artist Polly Stanton in our collective form of Burrow, we decided that we wanted to make a radio piece as beautiful as it was chilling, which would have the possibility of revisiting an event of anthropogenic, or human caused, environmental crisis through myriad historical, political and affective narratives. We called our piece And then the sea came back.

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Green Connect – A different Warrawong

AUSCCER PhD Candidate Ananth Gopal reflects on his time volunteering with social enterprise Green Connect and the possibilities for productive relations to grow.

 

Warrawong sits on the south side of Port Kembla, downwind of the steelworks sloping into Lake Illawarra. For decades from the 1930s it housed successive waves of migrant communities. Before that, colonial migrant farmers knew it as a place of rich, fertile soils fed by Mt Kembla’s alluvial material. For millennia prior, the Dharawal nation nurtured this Country.

 

Compost - Green Connect Farm Warrawong

Compost – Green Connect urban farm Warrawong

Today, a Google search yields some underwhelming, albeit unscientific, findings: A 75 year old woman mugged last week, a gas fire which blew up a building and, the immolation of 16 puppies in a house fire. Its Wikipedia entry offers tepid consolation: ‘home to the third largest shopping centre in the Illawarra.’ With industrial decline in full-swing one could easily conclude Warrawong’s best years are behind it.

I’ve been spending time in Warrawong for nearly 18 months now. There’s a farm there at the back of Warrawong High School. One quite unlike any I know: Urban Grown, run by Green Connect. In the last three years Warrawong has begun to grow a different kind of notoriety, one that reimagines what industrial decline can look like. One that Human Geographers ought to take notice of. Continue reading

AUSCCER’s Guide to the IAG 2016

IAG LogoInstitute of Australian Geographers Conference 2016

‘Frontiers of Geographical Knowledge’

29th June – 1st July, Adelaide, South Australia

 

 

 

Next week, 11 AUSCCERites will be attending the annual Institute of Australian Geographers Conference in Adelaide, South Australia.

The full program for the conference is available here, but with so many UOW speakers we’ve put together ‘AUSCCER’s Guide to the IAG’ so you don’t miss a thing!

If you’re not attending the IAG, you can follow the conversation via twitter using #IAG2016 or AUSCCERites’ twitter handles (see below).

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Who makes your clothes?

A clearer picture is emerging of the impacts of the fashion industry.

It is now known to be the second most polluting industry in the world, only after oil.

Where do your clothes come from?

Where do your clothes come from?

The production of fabric and textiles consumes large amounts of water and energy, and creates huge volumes of waste.

It is responsible for countless human and non-human social and ethical violations.

It is an industry that affects us every single day.

Each year Fashion Revolution Week (18-24th April 2016) brings people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes.

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Children, youth and families living in the city

Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference, Adelaide

June 29th – July 1st 2016

Call for Papers

Session Sponsors: Cultural Geography Study Group

Session Organisers: Susannah Clement and Kiera Kent, University of Wollongong

What is a child friendly city? How do families create space in the city? How might we include the experiences of young people and families in research?

This IAG session focuses on the everyday experiences of children, youth and families living in urban areas. This session aims to show the diversity of children, youth and family geography research coming from Australian and international contexts.

Where do the children play. Children play at darling Harbour in the spiral fountain. Photo Brendan Esposito smh,news,021207

Where do the children play in the city? Photo: Brendan Esposito

As Cloke and Jones (2005) argue, children are often positioned as problematic in urban (adult) spaces because they challenge the boundaries placed on them and create disorder. Work by Children’s Geographers (e.g. Holloway & Valentine 2000; Matthews & Limb 1999) have engaged with the ‘New Social Studies of Childhood’, which Continue reading

More than drunkenness and disorderly bodies: the gendered pleasures of drinking cultures

Post by Gordon Waitt and Susannah Clement

Australian drinking culture is facing increasing public scrutiny in relation to health, conduct and cultural legitimacy. Australian media is flooded with reports of the crises of alcohol fuelled violence in the night time economy of cities, and statistics that suggest that younger women living in metropolitan centres are drinking as much as their male counterparts.The attention given to young metropolitan people’s binge drinking has reveal one shadier side of Australian cultures of alcohol and the quest for drunkenness and disorderly bodies. But what of rural drinking cultures?

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Postcard from Turkey

On the 2nd September the body of a 3 year old Syrian boy washed up on the beach of Bodrum, Turkey. He, along with his brother and mother were 3 of 12 people to drown as their boats capsized trying to cross the Aegean Sea from Turkey to the Greek island of Kos. I’m not going to post the picture here, it’s fairly distressing and to be honest you’ve probably already seen it splashed across newspapers and webpages. It’s the image that brought the plight of Syrian refugees into the immediate consciousness of the rest of the world.

This unfolded whilst I was attending the RGS/IBG Annual Conference at the University of Exeter, a week before my trip to Turkey. Relatives and friends asked, ‘You’re not going to Bodrum are you?’ ‘Ummm I don’t think so’, but as I googled my tour destinations I realised that whilst I wasn’t going to Bodrum, I was going very close, touring up the same coastline.

Debates raged in the media and in conversation around ‘the image of the little boy’. Should this be shown? YES, I though, we need to be shocked into action. We need to see this! But do shocking images really make us change? I thought so, but now I doubt myself. Continue reading

Is walking becoming redundant?

According to the most recent census data, the average Australian household owns one or more vehicles with close to 65% of the workforce traveling to work each day by car, compared to less than 4% who walk. Furthermore, according to the 2014 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Young People only 33% of children and young people walk or cycle to school, with this average dropping when they reach high school. Public health experts are continually urging us stop sitting at our desks and move more through the promotion of ‘walk to school’ days, but many are cynical of the retention and upkeep of these one-off practices. So what does this mean for our health, the sustainability of our transport systems and the relationships we have with our neighbourhoods? What does this mean for walking? Continue reading