Our most clicked posts in 2013

It’s been a busy year here and most AUSCCERites are now taking a well-deserved Christmas break. So for our final blog post of the year we’re revisiting some of our most clicked, read and shared pieces in 2013. Thanks for reading and sharing Conversations with AUSCCER this year and we’ll see you in 2014.

Postcards from India by Michael Adams
This three part blog series started in December last year but it’s worth revisiting. Michael Adams travelled to India to explore the possibilities of collaborating with Indian colleagues on some research topics. In his first postcard from India Michael said “I have one possible advantage in research in India: I was born in Calcutta (now Kolkata), the fifth generation on my mother’s side to be born in India; and one possible major disadvantage: I know nothing about cricket, which along with Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism and Christianity, is one of India’s great religions”. You can read his first postcard from India here, the second postcard here and his final one here.

Village India (photo: Eva Hampel)

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Reflections on the Institute of Australian Geographers Conference by Alex Tindale and Charles Gillon
AUSCCER’s Alex Tindale and Charles Gillon attended the 2013 Institute of Australian Geographers Conference in Perth from July 1 to 4 and both wrote about their experience. We received great feedback about this post which you can read here.

Charles Gillon presenting in the Urban Political Ecologies themed session, July 3rd 2013 (Photo Credit: A. Tindale)

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The conversation we need to have about carbon by Lesley Head
In July one of our most shared posts was written by Lesley Head for The Conversation. We also published the article on our blog. In her piece Lesley said recent conversations about carbon pricing are framed within gentle themes of continuing growth and well-being, where no one has to pay more for anything without being compensated. The words that need to be in our conversations are transformation, rationing and shared sacrifice.

 

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Climate change and regions by Chris Gibson
Another popular blog series in 2013 was written by Chris Gibson on climate change and regions. The three part series was built on papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Sustainability Transitions at ETH Zurich, the annual Institute of Australian Geographers conference at the University of Western Australia, and the 2013 National Climate Change Adaptation (NCCARF) conference in Sydney. The first post is here, the second was Back to the future: climate change and regional inheritances and the third focused on Transition, adaptation, metamorphosis: framing climate change and regional response.

A tram departing from the university, ETH Zurich.

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Did you meet Professor Lesley Head?
This year we started a new type of blog post to give you a more personal insight into some of the people within AUSCCER. We kicked off with Lesley Head and were given great feedback about the words of wisdom she offered in her answers to ten questions. You can revisit this Q&A here. We’re planning to continue publishing these kinds of personal posts in 2014.

 

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Reflections from the fire front and research in its ashen wake by Christine Eriksen and Trent Penman
Our most read and shared post of 2013 was about the recent bushfire emergency in the Blue Mountains. Christine Eriksen and Trent Penman wrote of the challenges and uncertainty of coexisting with fire. In it they said “In the midst of this media frenzy it is important to remember that there are over 200 families that have lost their houses (and in many cases all their material belongings). Many more have been impacted in other ways, such as losing pets, damage to their property, the psychological terror of living through a devastating fire, or setting aside jobs and personal lives to join hundreds of volunteer fire fighters to battle the blaze. These impacts will affect individuals and communities for years to come – for better or for worse”. You can read the full piece here.

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Know yourself and pace yourself by Lesley Head
This was a post that had lots of people talking on Twitter. It was written by Lesley Head on the temporalities of academic writing and was an edited version of a discussion-starter presentation used at the UWS School of Social Sciences and Psychology writing retreat. Her original presentation used some interesting visual aids including weetbix, tampons, a shopping docket and some lego… See what all the fuss was about here.

 


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Let the sea reclaim the pools?
And our last post from December by Leah Gibbs was also one of our most read and probably because it explored the recent decision by Wollongong City Council to let some of the city’s beloved ocean pools go to the sea. Revisit Leah’s post here.

Community mobilise to ‘Save Our Rock Pool’.

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