A silver bowl filled with snow, a heron hidden in the moon – full-immersion methodologies

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For the last few years I have been approaching research using ‘full-immersion’ methodologies: ‘the method that requires investigators to become, as completely as possible, that which they wish to understand’ (Desmond 2011,  drawing on Wacquant 2004 – thanks to Christine Eriksen for drawing my attention to Desmond’s phrase). Consequently, my work on hunting (Adams 2013, Adams 2014, and another forthcoming this year) required me to acquire a firearm and appropriate licences and learn to hunt – to become a hunter.

Currently, I am following this approach with freediving research. Continue reading

UOW HuGS celebrates its 1st birthday! A reflection on 12 months of achievements

Gallery

This gallery contains 12 photos.

Today marks the exciting milestone of the UOW Human Geography Society’s (HuGS) first birthday!! I wanted to take this opportunity to reflect on the achievements of the past 12 months, recap our events so far, share the experiences of some … Continue reading

Who makes your clothes?

A clearer picture is emerging of the impacts of the fashion industry.

It is now known to be the second most polluting industry in the world, only after oil.

Where do your clothes come from?

Where do your clothes come from?

The production of fabric and textiles consumes large amounts of water and energy, and creates huge volumes of waste.

It is responsible for countless human and non-human social and ethical violations.

It is an industry that affects us every single day.

Each year Fashion Revolution Week (18-24th April 2016) brings people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes.

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AAG Conference 2016 San Francisco – AUSCCER Program

AAGAssociation of American Geographers’ Conference

San Francisco

29 March – 2 April

 

Next week, 15 AUSCCERites will be attending the annual Association of American Geographers conference in cool but sunny San Franciso (have those jackets ready!).

AUSCCER’s academics and PhD candidates will be sharing their latest work, including research into:

  • food and household sustainability
  • geographies of making
  • freediving
  • community gardens
  • shared living spaces in the city
  • assemblages of mobility
  • anxieties of distant labour
  • gender and wildfire

A list of AUSCCER presentations, panel and discussion sessions can be found below.

If you’re not attending the AAG, you can follow the conversation via twitter using #AAG2016 or AUSCCERites’ twitter handles (see below).

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Conversations on using assemblage thinking in geography

Conversations on using assemblage thinking in geography

Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference, Adelaide

June 29th – July 1st 2016

Call for Papers

Session Organisers: Carrie Wilkinson and Ryan Frazer, University of Wollongong

 

Geographers are increasingly interested in the possibilities afforded by thinking through assemblage. It appears to be fast becoming an essential addition to the geographer’s toolkit. At its most general, assemblage provides a way of accounting for the ordering of heterogeneous phenomena into a provisional whole. The promise of assemblage, as Müller writes, is a radical “rethinking [of] the relations between power, politics and space from a more processual, socio-material perspective” (2015, p.27). It offers a way of conceptualising forms as they gather, cohere, fracture, and disperse within an always immanent ontology. Continue reading

Children, youth and families living in the city

Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference, Adelaide

June 29th – July 1st 2016

Call for Papers

Session Sponsors: Cultural Geography Study Group

Session Organisers: Susannah Clement and Kiera Kent, University of Wollongong

What is a child friendly city? How do families create space in the city? How might we include the experiences of young people and families in research?

This IAG session focuses on the everyday experiences of children, youth and families living in urban areas. This session aims to show the diversity of children, youth and family geography research coming from Australian and international contexts.

Where do the children play. Children play at darling Harbour in the spiral fountain. Photo Brendan Esposito smh,news,021207

Where do the children play in the city? Photo: Brendan Esposito

As Cloke and Jones (2005) argue, children are often positioned as problematic in urban (adult) spaces because they challenge the boundaries placed on them and create disorder. Work by Children’s Geographers (e.g. Holloway & Valentine 2000; Matthews & Limb 1999) have engaged with the ‘New Social Studies of Childhood’, which Continue reading

Responding to the ‘refugee crisis’: critical geographies and the politics of support

RGS-IBG ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2016

Royal Geographical Society, London

30th August – 3rd September 2016

Call for Papers

 

Responding to the ‘refugee crisis’: critical geographies and the politics of support

Session Organisers: Jonathan Darling (University of Manchester) and Ryan Frazer (University of Wollongong)

 

The last year has seen political and popular discussions of migration dominated by a language of ‘crisis’ and emergency response. From the ongoing securitisation of the Calais freight terminal, to the production of new border walls in Europe, policies on migration over the last year have focused on extending trends of extraterritorial exclusion, political distancing, and the deferral of moral responsibility. Yet at the same time, the mass movement of refugees witnessed in Europe has raised profound questions over the desirability, and effectiveness, of these responses.

Syrian refugees strike at the platform

Syrian refugees strike at the platform of Budapest Keleti railway station, Hungary, 4 September 2015. Photo by Mstyslav Chernov.

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Making space for writing: geography and research writing

RGS-IBG ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2016
Royal Geographical Society, London

30th August – 3rd September 2016

Call for Papers

Making space for writing: geography and research writing

Sponsored by the Higher Education Research Group of the RGS-IBG

Session Organisers: Rae Dufty-Jones (Western Sydney University) and Chris Gibson (University of Wollongong)

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Space, Entitlement and Spectacle at New Orleans Jazzfest

by Nick Skilton, Peta Wolifson & Shaun McKiernan

(Enjoying slushies earlier in the day before things got crazily crazy.)

(Enjoying slushies earlier in the day before things got crazily crazy.)

Last year, three geography postgraduate students attended a music festival in the birthplace of jazz. This is what they found…

A Summary of the Day: Nick and Shaun

The Jazz and Heritage Festival is a big deal in New Orleans (NOLA). I don’t think we realised how big a deal until we were submerged in a sea of sweat, smuggled spirits, and sound. But we’ll get to that. ‘NOLA Jazzfest’ as it commonly known has grown from its humble beginnings in 1970 when 350 people attended. On that day, Duke Ellington, The Preservation Hall Band, Fats Domino, and Mahalia Jackson (who was not booked, but simply heard about the Festival and showed up to sing), plus many others performed. In 2015, 460,000 punters turned up over the 10 days (2 weekends with the week in between), the largest attendance since Hurricane Katrina. Miserable weather on the first weekend however saw to it that the second weekend accommodated the bulk of that number but random locals we encountered in the following days claimed (since the organisers now no longer release daily attendance figures) that the Saturday that we attended may have rivalled the 2001 single day record of 160,000 attendees when Dave Matthews Band and Mystikal performed during the peak of their powers. Anyway, you get the picture. It was packed.

(It looks small but it’s really not. However, still not big enough for Saturday’s crowd.)

(It looks small but it’s really not. However, still not big enough for Saturday’s crowd.)

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Cyberspace, the ‘Blog’ and Research Writing

Post by Rae Dufty-Jones

Writing and Space Series: Post 3/3

… ‘our writing equipment takes part of the forming of our thoughts’ (Nietzsche, 2005 in Kitchin et al., 2013: 68).

I like the above quote from Nietzche (and I suspect that the reason why Kitchin et al. selected it as quote in their paper) is that it argues that what we write with (pen and paper or word processor) and what we disseminate our writing through (paper or a computer screen) are not passive mediums through which our writing is produced and received but are instead significant actants that play an integral role in influencing how our ideas develop and are understood by our readers. As Isin and Ruppert (2015: 2) succinctly put it ‘we not only do things with words but do words with things’. Nowhere is this clearer than in the case of how the Internet and ‘cyberspace’ are changing research writing practices and products. Of particular interest to this series on writing and space is the way the various technologies associated with cyberspace have been variously heralded as a means of overcoming space-time barriers to how ideas/knowledge are disseminated. Continue reading